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Title: February 7

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies López Tijerina organized the northern New Mexico descendants of original land grantees to recover their rights to the land.

February 7 Hoping to finalize the resolution, I made my seventh trip to Santa Fe today. I brought warriors from throughout the state: Tierra Amarilla, Canjilon, Coyote, Española, Taos, Las Vegas, Tecolote, Chilili, Santa Rosa, Bernalillo, Cuba de...

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Title: I’ve Done My Bit on the Border

Source(s): Chapter Four: Revenge and Reprisal; Border Fury: A Picture Postcard Record of Mexico’s Revolution and U.S. War Preparedness, 1910-1917

Author(s): James J. Verhoeks (Author); Paul J. Vanderwood (Author); Frank N. Samponaro (Author)

A poem by a bugler in the 32nd Michigan Infantry, which served on the US-Mexico border in 1916.

I’ve done my bit on the border I wish I was in God’s country again I’ve had my fill of the border Of Greasers and border men I’ve eaten the dirt of Texas I’ve drank of the Rio Grande I’ve grubbed mesquite in the cursed heat (The Lo...

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Title: Crypto-Jews and the Spanish Inquisition in the New World

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief description of Jews in the Spanish world

In 1481, the Catholic Monarchs, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, established the Holy Office of the Inquisition. The Inquisition was established to create a total Catholic state; that is, all persons living in Spain were required to be Ca...

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Title: They Couldn’t Make Enough Money With The Cows That They Had

Author(s): Al Padilla and Joe Padilla (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Al and Joe Padilla describe being on their family’s homestead and the diverse ways people made a living.

Joe: See, my dad did all kinds of work. My dad worked for the railroad. He worked for that Sais Crusher, and also on construction of US 60 there. And the reason for that is because they couldn’t make enough money with the cows that they had. For so...

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Title: A Hundred And Fifty Dollars For A Section!

Author(s): Sylvestre Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Sylvestre Sisneros talks about the way his family homesteaded south of Abo ruins during the Depression.

Okay, there was about five sections south of Abo near Chupadero Mesa that they couldn’t dispose of it under the original Homestead Act (which only allowed 160 acres), because the land didn’t have any water. It was good grazing, but it was far ou...

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Title: Settlement and Homesteading in East-Central New Mexico

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight; William Penner

A brief history of settlement and homesteading in east-central New Mexico.

New Mexico’s population grew during the nineteenth century. Hispano families began to settle beyond the Rio Grande Valley and establish new villages. Some communities obtained land grants from the Spanish or Mexican governments; others settled with...

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