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21doc image icon

Title: Chester Arthur Tells about How the Navajo Were Corralled

Source(s): The Navajo Indians

Author(s): Chester Arthur (Author); Dane Coolidge (Author); Mary Roberts Coolidge (Author)

An account of the destruction of Navajo crops, livestock and lives by the U.S. Army under Colonel Kit Carson (Red Shirt).

That frightened the young men and they fled, but the soldiers did not come back. At first the Navajos were afraid and watched the trails, but as summer came on with lots of rain, they went back to their old homes and planted corn. Even around Fort De...

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22doc image icon

Title: Dinétah - Manuelito

Source(s): Dinétah: An Early History of the Navajo People

Author(s): Manuelito (Author); Lawrence D. Sundberg (Author)

A quote from Manuelito, a leader of the Dineh people, on their release from Fort Sumner.

“When we saw the top of the mountain from Albuquerque, we wondered if it was our mountain, and we felt like talking to the ground, we loved it so. Some of the old men and women cried with joy when they reached their homes.”

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23doc image icon

Title: Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography

Author(s): Walter Dyk (Author)

A detailed description by Walt Dyk of how prayers and songs were handed on, from father to (in this case) nephew.

That winter, while we lived on Black Mountain at Willows Coming Out, Who Has Mules came to our place. I was out herding. When I returned with the sheep towards evening he came out of the hogan and rode away. He’d been with my father all day; they m...

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24doc image icon

Title: The Names: A Memoir

Author(s): N. Scott Momaday (Author)

A narration of a Navajo gathering on the road to San Ysidro, with some very daring horse riding.

About midday the Navajos began to arrive. And they seemed all to come, as a whole people, as if it was their racial destiny to find at last the center of the world, the place of origin, older than tsegi, among the rocks. From the yard of the day scho...

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25doc image icon

Title: Laguna

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

People from neighboring Acoma and other pueblos established Laguna Pueblo in the last years of the 1600s. In 1699, Governor Cubero of Nuevo México formally named the pueblo San José de la Laguna (“Saint Joseph of the Lake”). The name refers to ...

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26doc image icon

Title: Abiquiu

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A short history of Abiquiu and its peoples, including genizaros in the 1700s.

The village of Abiquiu lies in the Chama River Valley on high ground above the Chama River. People made their homes in the Chama River Valley for at least 5,000 years before the establishment of this village in the 1700s. We know this because we find...

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27doc image icon

Title: Tierra Amarilla

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of Tierra Amarilla.

The village of Tierra Amarilla lies in the Chama River Valley. Groups of hunters and gatherers lived in this valley as far back as about 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists know about at least ten significant pueblo sites along the Chama River, between p...

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28doc image icon

Title: Navajo Code Talkers

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

During World War II, many Navajos serving in the Marine Corps worked as “code talkers,” using a code in the Navajo language that the Japanese forces could not break for relaying information between US troops.

Although the United States government finally granted citizenship to Native Americans in 1924, the states of New Mexico and Arizona denied native people the right to vote until 1948. Nevertheless, during World War I (1917-1919) many Native Americans,...

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29doc image icon

Title: Trading Posts in the American Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overall description of trading posts in the American Southwest.

For hundreds of years, people of the American Southwest traded among themselves. They used a system of barter to exchange everything from furs, bison hides, foods, woven material, and clothing to pottery, beads, feathers, and turquoise. The establish...

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30doc image icon

Title: The Indian Traders

Author(s): Frank McNitt (Author)

A description of typical goods for sale or barter at trading posts; the preface describes one trading post and merchant in Cabezon in the Rio Puerco area.

...flour, lard, sugar, green coffee in hundred pound sacks (customers roasting the beans in ovens at home and then grinding them), and canned goods. On their shelves were bolts of calico, fine muslins, Spanish lace, cards of fancy buttons, and spools...

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