DocumentsImages
Results Found: 50
Matching Keywords: water [ ? ] Search Help
See 5 Image Results
Content Information
1doc image icon

Title: Report Finds Mine Could Harm Sacred Lake

Author(s): Ben Neary, Santa Fe New Mexican (Author)

Santa Fe New Mexican article on the Zuni effort to preserve the Salt Lake for religious purposes

An Arizona power company’s plan to pump groundwater for a huge coal mine in western New Mexico could harm a lake sacred to Zuni Pueblo, a new hydrology report commissioned by the pueblo says. For years, Zuni Pueblo has opposed plans by the S...

Show Keywords:

2doc image icon

Title: Zuni Origins and Migrations

Source(s): A Zuni Atlas

Author(s): T.J. Ferguson (Author); E. Richard Hart (Author)

These are some of the stories Zunis tell about the orgin of their people and their migration to the Middle Place.

The Zunis were created in the fourth world. Their immortal gods led them up through the third, second, and first worlds into the light of day. They emerged deep inside a canyon somewhere along the Colorado River. After the people had washed the slime...

Show Keywords:

3doc image icon

Title: A Zuni Life: A Pueblo Indian in Two Worlds

Author(s): Virgil Wyaco (Author)

A Zuni Indian writes about leaving the pueblo to attend the BIA boarding school in Albuquerque in 1936.

In 1936, when I was in the sixth grade, I heard about the Indian School in Albuquerque, one of the BIA boarding schools, and I thought about having a different lifestyle and learning new things in a big city. My principal, Mrs. Gonzales, sent in an a...

Show Keywords:

4doc image icon

Title: The Vengeance of Gouyen

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Eve Ball (Author); Nora Henn (Author); Lynda A. Sanchez

The widow Gouyen seeks revenge against a Comanche chief for killing her husband.

The Apache girl lay in the brush arbor of her mother-in-law waiting for the older woman to sleep. Her name is one the Apaches are forbidden to mention and she is known today only as Gouyen, Wise Woman, a term reserved only for the intelligent and cha...

Show Keywords:

5doc image icon

Title: Barboncito’s Speech to General Sherman at Fort Sumner

Source(s): Dinétah: An Early History of the Navajo People

Author(s): Barboncito (Author); Lawrence D. Sundberg (Author)

The Navajo leader Barboncito tells General Sherman to release the Navajos from captivity at Fort Sumner.

Bringing us here has made many of us die, also a great number of our animals. Our Grandfathers had no idea of living in any other place except our own land, and I don't think it is right for us to do what we were taught not to do. When the Navajo wer...

Show Keywords:

6doc image icon

Title: Corn

Source(s): The Zuni Indians and Their Uses of Plants

Author(s): Matilda Coxe Stevenson (Author)

Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson describes the many ways in which Zuni people use corn.

Though not indigenous to the United States, corn was the staple food of the inhabitants of the Southwest long before the coming of the Spaniards in the middle of the sixteenth century, having been brought to this section either by peoples migrating f...

Show Keywords:

7doc image icon

Title: The Rio Grande Watershed - Keresan

Source(s): Keresan (program 7); The Spirit of Place

Author(s): Jack Loeffler (Oral Historian); Elaine Thatcher (Oral Historian)

Programs 7, 8 & 9 address the Rio Grande del Norte and feature voices of Keresan Indians, Tewa Indians and Hispanos who have traditionally sustained themselves in small communities throughout the watershed. Featured participants: Harold Littlebird...

Show Keywords:

8doc image icon

Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

Show Keywords:

9doc image icon

Title: The Origins of Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

When people started to make pottery and how it changed their societies.

Small bands of indigenous peoples roamed the American Southwest between 10,000 BCE and 1000 CE. They moved around following game and gathering whatever plants were in season. They may have carried their belongings and foodstuffs in baskets. Peopl...

Show Keywords:

10doc image icon

Title: Acoma Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Acoma pottery in the past and today.

From earliest times, Pueblo Indian potters have made ceramic pots for practical daily use. Pueblo people carried, cooked, and stored water and food in pottery. They also used it for ceremonial purposes. The exceptional quality of Acoma pottery made i...

Show Keywords:

Results Found: 50 1 2 3 4 5 Next