DocumentsImages
Results Found: 8
Matching Keywords: tepees [ ? ] Search Help
See 4 Image Results
Content Information
1doc image icon

Title: Early Life

Source(s): Geronimo: His Own Story

Author(s): Geronimo (Author); S. M. Barrett (Oral Historian)

Famed Chiricahua Apache war chief Geronimo speaks of his childhood and how a boy becomes a warrior. As Told to S. M. Barrett.

I was born in No-doyohn Cañon, Arizona, June, 1829. In that country which lies around the headwaters of the Gila River I was reared. This range was our fatherland; among these mountains our wigwams were hidden; the scattered valleys contained our fi...

Show Keywords:

2doc image icon

Title: The Vengeance of Gouyen

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Eve Ball (Author); Nora Henn (Author); Lynda A. Sanchez

The widow Gouyen seeks revenge against a Comanche chief for killing her husband.

The Apache girl lay in the brush arbor of her mother-in-law waiting for the older woman to sleep. Her name is one the Apaches are forbidden to mention and she is known today only as Gouyen, Wise Woman, a term reserved only for the intelligent and cha...

Show Keywords:

3doc image icon

Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

Show Keywords:

4doc image icon

Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

Show Keywords:

5doc image icon

Title: The Rescue of Two Mexican Boys

Source(s): Life Among the Apaches

Author(s): John C. Cremony (Author)

An American traveling with the band of Apache chief Mangas Colorado helps to free two young Mexican captives.

It has already been stated that my tent was pitched several hundred yards from the rest of the Commission, and hidden from the view of my companions by an intervening hillock. This fact rendered me far more cautious than I otherwise would have been. ...

Show Keywords:

6doc image icon

Title: Last Living Apache Scout

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Big Mouth (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Big Mouth describes the defeat and imprisonment of his people at Fort Sumner.

I am Big Mouth, last living scout of the Apache wars. I served in the campaigns against Victorio and Geronimo. I do not know my exact age, but I was six or seven years old when my people, the Mescalero Apaches, were forced into captivity at Fort Sumn...

Show Keywords:

7doc image icon

Title: The Legend of Swift Wind

Source(s): Apache Legends: Songs of the Wind Dancer

Author(s): Lou Cuevas (Author); Lou Cuevas (Author)

The tale of a boy who, transformed into a roadrunner, saves his people from wolves.

Many ages ago, when the land belonged to the ancient Ndee, later known as the Apache, the Swift Wind story came into being. Since then, some have forgotten the tale, some do not understand it. Even today, among many clans, there are few who know of i...

Show Keywords:

8doc image icon

Title: The Utes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Utes.

The Utes call themselves Nunt’z, “the people.” In former times, the Utes roamed in eleven bands across much of Colorado, Utah, and parts of Arizona and New Mexico. Today they live on reservations in southern Colorado and eastern Utah. As many a...

Show Keywords:

Results Found: 8