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Title: The Vengeance of Gouyen

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Eve Ball (Author); Nora Henn (Author); Lynda A. Sanchez

The widow Gouyen seeks revenge against a Comanche chief for killing her husband.

The Apache girl lay in the brush arbor of her mother-in-law waiting for the older woman to sleep. Her name is one the Apaches are forbidden to mention and she is known today only as Gouyen, Wise Woman, a term reserved only for the intelligent and cha...

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Title: Horse-Breaking

Source(s): Recollections of a Western Ranchman; Horse-Breaking and Cattle-Rustling

Author(s): Captain William French (Author)

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

When I got down, there were two or three [horses] in the corral in various phases of being roped and saddled with their prospective riders attending to them. The rest of the outfit were seated on the gate or in its neighborhood, and amongst them I re...

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Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

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Title: The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women

Source(s): Dark and Perfect Angels

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz writes about the Tarahumaran women who beg in the streets of Juarez along the U.S.-Mexico border.

1991. The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women They sit, ubiquitous, more numerous than mangos at the market. These women raise their children on the street—raise them To the dawn from their ungiving beds (cement is hard but it is free). ...

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Title: Work

Source(s): Elegies In Blue: Poems

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz dedicates the poem “Work” to the workers in the Juárez maquilas, factories along the US-Mexico border.

for the workers in the Juárez maquilas On the border, we live in a desert of translation. Our words are difficult and dry. How do you say rain? How do you say river? How do you say the sand on which I Walk is thirsty as a white sun? How do you...

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Results Found: 5