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Title: Carl Meets His Cousin-Brother

Source(s): Katzimo, Mysterious Mesa

Author(s): Bobette Bibo Gugliotta (Author)

The son of an Acoma mother and a German-Jewish father visits his mother's village for the first time and meets his cousin.

With a quick motion of his hand Horace indicated the path that the group was ascending. “Do you want to walk up the foot trail or do you want to climb the split trail?” He threw the choice at Carl like a challenge. Without hesitating Carl repl...

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Title: Taos Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo of Taos Indians

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

As in Ancient Days, Pueblo of the Taos Indians, Taos, N. Mex.

The Pueblo Indians of the Southwest were very different from those farther east and north. They were partially civilized and knew how to weave baskets and blankets and to make pottery. They are rather shorter and darker in color than other Indian...

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Title: Yo sé que viví muy a gusto [I Know I Lived Very Comfortably]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco Valley

Author(s): Taida Sánchez-García (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico. Taida Sánchez-García describes living on a ranch and growing and conserving chiles and other foods.

Well, the rancher’s life was such that everybody had to work for themselves. Because that’s just the way it was over there [in Guadalupe]. Everyone worked for themselves with whatever they had: corn, pinto beans, or whatever you planted. That was...

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Title: Carretas del Muerto

Source(s): Brothers of Light: The Penitentes of the Southwest

Author(s): Alice Corbin Henderson (Author)

Alice Corbin Henderson describes the Penitente tradition of dragging the Carreta del Muerto in processions.

Finding our way back to the plaza, we stood in the shadow of one of the low adobe buildings, where we could watch the procession passing. It was now quite dark, except for half moonlight in a mottled sky. The bulk of the church looked against the edg...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

Hilda Faunce writes about her life at a trading post before the first World War (1914-1918). In this passage, she describes a terrible smallpox epidemic on the reservation.

I never should have supposed I could be calm in a smallpox epidemic. It came upon us suddenly and almost immediately dozens of our friends and customers were dead. The Indians came to the post with their bodies covered with sores; they lay down o...

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Title: Life at Wide Ruins

Source(s): Wide Ruins

Author(s): Sallie R. Wagner (Author)

Sallie Wagner writes of her days running a trading post with her husband on the Navajo reservation in the 1930s and 1940s.

It took some months for the people to decide that it might be all right to trade with us. The test came when Bent Knee arrived to take a deerskin out of pawn and found that the skin was still in the building. It was the custom, when selling a post, t...

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Title: One-Eyed Sky

Source(s): Xavier’s Folly and Other Stories

Author(s): Max Evans (Author)

Story of an old cow protecting her newborn calf from a mother coyote and her cubs.

The cow lifted her muzzle from the muddy water of the tank. She must go now. Her time was at hand. She could feel the pressure of the unborn between her bony hips. With the springless clicking tread of an old, old cow she moved out towards the rollin...

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Title: The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women

Source(s): Dark and Perfect Angels

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz writes about the Tarahumaran women who beg in the streets of Juarez along the U.S.-Mexico border.

1991. The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women They sit, ubiquitous, more numerous than mangos at the market. These women raise their children on the street—raise them To the dawn from their ungiving beds (cement is hard but it is free). ...

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Results Found: 8