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Title: Borrowed Feathers: Don’t Look Up: Back to Life

Source(s): Pueblo Indian Folk Tales

Author(s): Hocheni of Acoma (Author); Elsie Clews Parsons (Oral Historian); N. V. Sanchez (Translator)

Coyote has a hard time with some pigeons and a spider.

Long ago at Hanishoku [a ruin near Acoma] the pigeons (houk) were flying about. They gave Coyote some of their feathers to fly with. Coyote (chuski) was heavy and lagged behind. The pigeons said, “Let us fly up to the water-hole on top of the mesa!...

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Title: The Arrival of My Mother —New Mexico Territory, 1906

Source(s): Lion’s Gate Selected Poems 1963-1986

Author(s): Keith Wilson (Author)

Poem describing the author’s mother’s arrival in New Mexico territory at the age of 25.

She got off, according to her diary, dressed in a lovely beaded gown, fresh from Washington with sixteen trunks of ballgowns, chemises, blouses (4 Middle), shoes and assorted lingerie. She was at that time about 25, old for an unmarried wom...

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Title: The Los Alamos Museum

Source(s): The Redshifting Web: Poems 1970-1998

Author(s): Arthur Sze (Author)

Poem describing replicas of the atomic bombs “Little Boy” and “Fat Man” at the Los Alamos Museum.

In this museum is a replica of “Little Boy” and “Fat Man.” In “Little Boy,” a radar echo set off an explosive which drove a ura- nium-235 wedge into a larger uranium target, while in “Fat Man.” the ordinary explosive crushed a holl...

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Title: The Woman at Otowi Crossing

Author(s): Frank Waters (Author)

An excerpt from a novel about the making of the first atomic bomb at Los Alamos and its detonation at White Sands.

This is it, thought Gaylord working in the blinding brilliance of the July sun. Trinity, when he first had heard it, was only a Top-Secret operational code name. Then, when more and more men began to leave Los Alamos and he himself accompanied them, ...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

Hilda Faunce writes about her life at a trading post before the first World War (1914-1918). In this passage, she describes a terrible smallpox epidemic on the reservation.

I never should have supposed I could be calm in a smallpox epidemic. It came upon us suddenly and almost immediately dozens of our friends and customers were dead. The Indians came to the post with their bodies covered with sores; they lay down o...

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Title: The Apache Diaries: A Father-Son Journey (excerpts)

Author(s): Grenville Goodwin (Author); Neil Goodwin (Author)

Neil Goodwin retraces the steps of his father, anthropologist Grenville Goodwin, who tried to find Chiricahua Apache groups living in the Sierra Madre of Mexico.

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Title: Apache Mothers and Daughters: Four Generations of a Family

Author(s): Ruth McDonald Boyer (Author); Narcissus Duffy Gayton (Author)

Remembrances of an Apache elder woman.

Between the times of battle the family traveled throughout Tchihéné lands and beyond. Usually it was in quest of plant foods or game, but whatever their reason, the journeys provided Dilth-cleyhen’s maternal kin time to inform the youngster more ...

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Title: Catholic Treasure

Source(s): High Lonesome: The Vanishing American West

Author(s): Dayton Lummis (Author)

Poem describing buried treasure that Spanish colonists and Conquistadores are said to have left in the bootheel region of NM.

The creaking of the windmill, rhythmic splash of water into the brimming tank— the only sounds in the desert, a place called “High Lonesome;” down in the Bootheel, in the shadow of Animas Peak, the old boy smiled and said, “Catho...

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Results Found: 8