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Title: The Beautiful and the Dangerous

Author(s): Barbara Tedlock (Author)

Barbara Tedlock, Zuni account of Frank Cushing

Tapping the image of the scalp pole, Joe said, “Did you know that way back in the 1880s, when that Whiteman called Kuushi (Frank Cushing) got initiated as a Bow Priest, he went out across Oak Wash to a Navajo hogan and took a scalp?” “What? ...

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Title: Zuni Salt Lake through the Lens of Time

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction to Salt Lake and its meanings.

In 1598, when Juan de Oñate colonized New Mexico, he sent Marcos Farfán to explore Zuni Salt Lake. Farfán reported that the lake was a marvelous thing; the entire surface was encrusted with salt, except for a place in the center where water bubble...

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Title: Zuni Salt Lake through the Lens of Time

Source(s): The Beautiful and the Dangerous

Author(s): Barbara Tedlock (Author)

Barbara Tedlock's description of Hapiya praying at the Salt Lake.

Hapiya stood at the end of a wooden plank someone had abandoned between the salt mine and cinder cones. He stooped down, made a hole at his feet, and then straightened up, facing east, to begin a long prayer. Near the end of the prayer he bent to ...

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Title: Zuni Origins and Migrations

Source(s): A Zuni Atlas

Author(s): T.J. Ferguson (Author); E. Richard Hart (Author)

These are some of the stories Zunis tell about the orgin of their people and their migration to the Middle Place.

The Zunis were created in the fourth world. Their immortal gods led them up through the third, second, and first worlds into the light of day. They emerged deep inside a canyon somewhere along the Colorado River. After the people had washed the slime...

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Title: Ancestral Boundaries

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Bert Puhueyestewa (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

Names the shrines that mark the boundaries of Hopi lands.

There are eight major Hopi shrines that mark the extent of our traditional Hopi country. One is at Tokonave, Black Mountain (the whites call it Navajo Mountain) in the north. Another is on the Supai Trail west of Grand Canyon Village. One is at Kawes...

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Title: Oraibi Before the Split

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Homer Cooyama, Kikeuchmovi, July 1970 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

A Hopi elder tells how the conflict between the Hostiles and the Friendlies within Oraibi society destroyed their ancient religion.

Before the split, Old Oraibi was a very complicated society. We were involved with different organizations, with fraternities, with groups (comparable to) the Masons, many things we don’t know too much about today. There were fourteen kivas in Old ...

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Title: The Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

In time, a long time, the warning rattling is heard and the antelope priests appear, walking quickly. They repeat the evolution of the day before, and their costumes are the same, but the effect somehow is much more tense. The whole crowd is held sil...

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Title: Navajo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Navajo history: early migration from Alaska and Canada to encounters with the Spanish and war with the United States; concludes with an account of contemporary Navajo life.

Traditional Navajo, or Diné, stories tell that First Man, First Woman, the Holy People, and all the animals had to pass through three different worlds before emerging into the Fourth or Glittering World. Here, the People saw four rivers bounded by f...

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Title: The Mimbres

Source(s): Whitewater Gila; Gila Descending: A Southwestern Journey

Author(s): M. H. Salmon (Author)

A contemporary reflection on the Mimbres people who once lived in Southwestern New Mexico.

They had come into these valleys as tattered bands just ages ago. They were afoot, the entirety of the forced simplicity of their lives contained in the packs on their backs. And they had, most likely, come up from the south, off the harsh deserts of...

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Title: Apache Mothers and Daughters: Four Generations of a Family

Author(s): Ruth McDonald Boyer (Author); Narcissus Duffy Gayton (Author)

Remembrances of an Apache elder woman.

Between the times of battle the family traveled throughout Tchihéné lands and beyond. Usually it was in quest of plant foods or game, but whatever their reason, the journeys provided Dilth-cleyhen’s maternal kin time to inform the youngster more ...

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Results Found: 10