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Title: The Spanish Siege at Acoma

Source(s): Flaming Arrow’’s People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo describes the terrible Spanish siege at Acoma in the 1590s.

On the top of the cliff to the south is the old Spanish church which the Spanish fathers forced my people to build by carrying the adobe dirt from the valley below in their shawls, on their backs, up that steep climb. The walls of the church are seve...

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Title: The Revolt Begins

Source(s): K'atsina: A Novel of Rebellion

Author(s): Lana M. Harrigan (Author)

In this novel, a Spanish-Acoma man and his family face the Pueblo Revolt.

By the next moon, Diego returned. The small, wiry Apache seemed made only of hardened sinew. In his black, piercing eyes burned a fire so intense it might have had its origin in Hell. No emotion showed on Hishti’s face as the husband she had not se...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Coyote Gets Rich Off the White Men

Source(s): American Indian Myths and Legends

Author(s): Traditional; Richard Erdoes (Editor); Alfonso Ortiz (Editor)

Coyote plays a trick on some white men.

Once when Coyote was visiting various camps, he and Bobcat heard about a white man who was making some whisky. They went together to the man’s house and managed to steal some, and after they had run a short distance with it, they stopped to drink. ...

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Title: Palöngawhoya Soy Niina (How Palöngawhoya Killed His Grandmother)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. They were living at Pöqangwwawarpi. The Pöqangwhoya twins had their house there. The brothers were little boys. Pöqangwhoya was the older’s name; the younger was called Palöngawhoya. They had only their grandmother to live with, and a...

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Title: The Creation of Man

Source(s): Myths and Tales of the Jicarilla Apache Indians

Author(s): Traditional; Morris Opler (Editor)

How Hactcin created human beings.

In the beginning the dog was just like a Hactcin in appearance. This was because the Hactcin made everything. He was listless, however, and didn’t do anything. And Hactcin noticed this and spoke to him. He said, “Why don’t you do something? ...

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Title: Catching Antelopes

Source(s): Childhood and Youth in Jicarilla Apache Society

Author(s): Traditional (Author); Morris Opler (Editor)

Children learn to be good runners by trying to catch antelope fawns.

The people moved constantly. Often they came to plains country. If they saw two antelope fawns lying there, the older people would tell the children, “Catch them with your hands. If you do, you will be good runners.” They would often tell two boy...

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Title: Boys’ Training

Source(s): Childhood and Youth in Jicarilla Apache Society

Author(s): Traditional; Morris Opler (Editor)

How grandfathers teach their grandsons to be men.

When there are many camps together, they make the boys train together and race against each other. Sometimes a man mounted on a horse rides to a boy. The boy has to catch hold of the mane of the horse and keep up with it without letting go. Sometimes...

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Title: Border Town: 1938

Source(s): Borders

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about a child’s experience of racial segregation.

She counts cement cracks little Esperanza with the long brown braids, counts so as not to hear the girls in the playground singing, “the farmer's in the dell the farmer's in the dell” laughing and running round-round while little Esp...

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Title: Taos Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo of Taos Indians

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

As in Ancient Days, Pueblo of the Taos Indians, Taos, N. Mex.

The Pueblo Indians of the Southwest were very different from those farther east and north. They were partially civilized and knew how to weave baskets and blankets and to make pottery. They are rather shorter and darker in color than other Indian...

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