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Title: The Mimbres

Source(s): Whitewater Gila; Gila Descending: A Southwestern Journey

Author(s): M. H. Salmon (Author)

A contemporary reflection on the Mimbres people who once lived in Southwestern New Mexico.

They had come into these valleys as tattered bands just ages ago. They were afoot, the entirety of the forced simplicity of their lives contained in the packs on their backs. And they had, most likely, come up from the south, off the harsh deserts of...

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Title: Work

Source(s): Elegies In Blue: Poems

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz dedicates the poem “Work” to the workers in the Juárez maquilas, factories along the US-Mexico border.

for the workers in the Juárez maquilas On the border, we live in a desert of translation. Our words are difficult and dry. How do you say rain? How do you say river? How do you say the sand on which I Walk is thirsty as a white sun? How do you...

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Title: Indian Traders: Recent Aspersions of Jake Morgan

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

A Navajo trader defends his profession against charges made by Jake Morgan, a former member of the Navajo Tribal Council.

The unwarranted attack on the traders to the Navajo Indians by Jake Morgan, former member of the Navajo tribal council, and the subsequent denial by the United Indian Traders Association, brings to an issue the status of the trader in Navajo affairs....

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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Title: Navajo Medicine Man Requests Christian Burial

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

The death of Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah; description of his Christian burial and traditional Navajo ceremonies.

Gallup, N.M., March 4, 1937 (AP)—Hosteen Klah, powerful Navajo shaman, master of a thousand pagan chants, was buried Wednesday with Christian ceremonies. Only in death did Klah, regarded by all his tribe as the most powerful of medicine men, for...

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Title: Navajo Revive an Ancient Ceremonial

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Description of Navajo rituals conducted to break the drought near Ganado, NM.

July 17, 1936. Fear of a devastating drouth has turned the Navajo living in the Ganado, Arizona, district to a rain-making ritual that has not been enacted in years, according to Roman Hubbell, Navajo trader. Under the direction of Beninie, Ganado...

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Title: Navajo Secrets Lost as Greatest Medicine Man Dies

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Associated Press

Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah dies at 70; with him go many secrets of Navajo spiritual ceremony.

REHOBOTH MISSION, N.M., March 3, 1937. (AP)—The spirit of the greatest of Navajo medicine men winged a weary journey around the world today, and with it flew many a precious secret of the tribe’s religious life. Four times, says Navajo religio...

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Title: Navajos Objecting to Stock Reduction Plan

Source(s): Associated Press, Window Rock, NM

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Newspaper article describing the Navajo nation’s objections to the US government’s stock reduction plan for the reservation in 1935.

Window Rock, Ariz., April 27, 1938. (AP)—Navajo service officials defending the reservation stock reduction program, held out a welcome today to a group of Indians proposing to march on the central agency here in protest to the plan. Referring t...

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Title: The Navajo Problem

Author(s): E.R. Fryer, Superintendent of the Navajo Reservation, Window Rock, Ariz. (Author)

The Superintendent of the Navajo reservation discusses the problem of Navajo lands degraded by overgrazing.

The predicament of the Great Navajo tribe is unequaled among American Indians. Here is the fastest growing autonomous group in the Nation. In 1868 they numbered less than 12,000; they herded only 40,000 sheep and goats. On the reservation today dwell...

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