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Title: Zuni

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction to Zuni

The Zuni, who call themselves A'shiwi, tell the story that long ago their gods cut off the peoples' tails, split the webs between their toes with stone knives, and led them from the underworld to seek their home in the center of the universe. When at...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Cattle

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Daklugie (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Daklugie describes how he became a cattle rancher and dealt with some rustlers.

So I took over. The government had given the prisoners a start in cattle, and in one year some of the men had become fairly good at handling them. All were good horsemen, but they had to learn how to rope and to flank calves. I had not done that eith...

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Title: Agarró nomás la Cuarto [He Just Grabbed the Whip]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Eduardo Valdez (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico, including Eduardo Valdez, who remembers the early days and the best cowboy around, Don Teodoro.

This Don Teodoro, and several others, not only him, because there were several horsemen there in Guadalupe, they say one day they penned up a herd of horses in a corral. And long ago they used to put two long poles on the corral and then they'd put a...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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Title: El Milagro del Santo Niño [The Miracle of the Santo Niño]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Edumenio “Ed” Lovato (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Edumenio “Ed” Lovato tells a story of the days when Indians captured Hispano children from outlying villages and carried them away.

Rafael’s sister, Candelaria, was a proud possessor of a small statue of the Santo Niño de Atocha [Holy Child of Atocha]. From childhood she had developed an ardent devotion for the Child Jesus, following the example of her mother, who was also a f...

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Title: The Old Spanish Trail

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Old Spanish Trail that traders traveled on between California and New Mexico.

Less well known today than the Old Santa Fe Trail, the Old Spanish Trail was a dynamic feature of the early days in the Spanish American Southwest. Long before the explorers and missionaries from Spain worked their way up from Old Mexico into Alta Ca...

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Title: En Divina Luz: The Penitente Moradas of New Mexico

Author(s): Michael Wallis (Author)

Northern New Mexico Penitente Hermanos (Brothers) speak of their deep commitment to their culture and spirituality within the brotherhood of La Fraternidad Piadoso de Nuestro Padre Jesus Nazarite (The Pious Fraternity of Our Father Jesus Nazarite).

“We are all normal, everyday people. We are ranchers, we are physicians, we are students, we are everyone. “We get together to pray. We find that praying can be a form of penance. “And we go to our morada to be reminded of the life of Chr...

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Title: The Utes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Utes.

The Utes call themselves Nunt’z, “the people.” In former times, the Utes roamed in eleven bands across much of Colorado, Utah, and parts of Arizona and New Mexico. Today they live on reservations in southern Colorado and eastern Utah. As many a...

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Title: Reies López Tijerina and the Tierra Amarilla Courthouse Raid

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A description of conflicts over land ownership in northern New Mexico. In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized the descendants of the original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their lands.

When the Spaniards claimed northern New Mexico as Spanish land in the 1600s, settlers from Spain and present-day Mexico formed ranching and farming communities on land long occupied by Native Americans. The Spanish authorities awarded land grants to ...

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