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Title: Expedition into New Mexico Made by Antonio de Espejo 1582-1583 as Revealed in the Journal of Diego Pérez de Luxan, a Member of the Party

Author(s): Diego Pérez de Luxan (Author); George Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

A merchant from New Spain journeys north as head of a relief party to find two Franciscan monks. Here he describes what his party found at Zuni.

We set out from this place on the fourteenth of the month and marched a league. We halted at the first pueblo of the province of Zuni which they called Malaque, in which we had a row of houses (for our use), and they gave us to eat of what they had u...

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Title: How the World Began

Source(s): When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away

Author(s): Ramon A. Gutíerrez (Author)

A noted scholar tells the story of how the world began according to the people of Acoma.

In the beginning two females were born underneath the earth at a place called Shipapu. In total darkness Tsichtinako (Thought Woman) nursed the sisters, taught them language and gave them each a basket that their father Uchtsiti had sent them contain...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Palöngawhoya Soy Niina (How Palöngawhoya Killed His Grandmother)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. They were living at Pöqangwwawarpi. The Pöqangwhoya twins had their house there. The brothers were little boys. Pöqangwhoya was the older’s name; the younger was called Palöngawhoya. They had only their grandmother to live with, and a...

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Title: Woodstove of My Childhood

Source(s): In the Gathering Silence

Author(s): Levi Romero (Author)

A poet describes the woodstove that heated his childhood home in northern New Mexico.

woodstove of my childhood where potatoes cut like triangle chips were fried in manteca de marrano woodstove of lazy autumn smoke swirling away to nowhere woodstove of December evacuating the cold chill at sunrise woodstove of celebrati...

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Title: The Utes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Utes.

The Utes call themselves Nunt’z, “the people.” In former times, the Utes roamed in eleven bands across much of Colorado, Utah, and parts of Arizona and New Mexico. Today they live on reservations in southern Colorado and eastern Utah. As many a...

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Title: One-Eyed Sky

Source(s): Xavier’s Folly and Other Stories

Author(s): Max Evans (Author)

Story of an old cow protecting her newborn calf from a mother coyote and her cubs.

The cow lifted her muzzle from the muddy water of the tank. She must go now. Her time was at hand. She could feel the pressure of the unborn between her bony hips. With the springless clicking tread of an old, old cow she moved out towards the rollin...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Results Found: 8