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Title: The Flaming Arrow Katsina

Source(s): Flaming Arrow's People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo tells the story of the katsina whose name he bears.

This is the story of the Katsina for whom I was named. It happened that the Sun had a boy born on the earth. The life of this boy came to his mother by the Sun’s rays shining through the gypsum rock window, and when the boy grew up he looked sha...

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Title: Turkey Makes the Corn and Coyote Plants It

Source(s): American Indian Myths and Legends

Author(s): Traditional; Richard Erdoes (Editor); Alfonso Ortiz (Editor)

Turkey teaches people how to grow corn, but Coyote doesn't learn the lesson.

Long ago when all the animals talked like people, Turkey overheard a boy begging his sister for food. “What does your little brother want?” he asked the girl. “He’s hungry, but we have nothing to eat,” she said. When Turkey heard this...

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Title: Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography

Author(s): Walter Dyk (Author)

A detailed description by Walt Dyk of how prayers and songs were handed on, from father to (in this case) nephew.

That winter, while we lived on Black Mountain at Willows Coming Out, Who Has Mules came to our place. I was out herding. When I returned with the sheep towards evening he came out of the hogan and rode away. He’d been with my father all day; they m...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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Title: Bailando en Sombras

Author(s): María L. Leyba (Author)

A poet dreams of her lost mother.

I lay curled in a veil of luto wide awake, eyelids that refuse to close hungry for my Mother's Tongue my restless soul drawn like magnets to sacred grounds donde bailo en sombras buscando mi querida madrecita. Mama's favorite rancheras echo i...

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Title: Grandfather

Source(s): Voices from the Rio Grande: Selections from the first Rio Grande Writers Conference

Author(s): Leroy Quintana (Author)

A poet writes about his grandfather, who long ago walked barefoot to Wyoming to herd sheep.

Grandfather, who planted corn every year walked to Wyoming to herd sheep so many times he said he couldn't remember how many I have been told that in his youth it took two men to wrestle him off his feet As an old man shouldered railr...

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Title: Trading Posts in the American Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overall description of trading posts in the American Southwest.

For hundreds of years, people of the American Southwest traded among themselves. They used a system of barter to exchange everything from furs, bison hides, foods, woven material, and clothing to pottery, beads, feathers, and turquoise. The establish...

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Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

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Title: El Corrido de Inmigrante (Ballad of an Immigrant)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; Mexican Voices/American Dreams: An Oral History of Mexican Immigration to the United States

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); Marilyn P. Davis

A Mexican ballad, or corrido, about how sad people are when they have to leave home to go to the United States.

Mexico, my homeland, where I was born, Give me the benediction of your powerful hand, I’m going to the United States to earn my living, Good-bye, my beloved country, I carry you in my heart, Don’t condemn me for leaving my country, Poverty a...

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Title: El Deportado (The Deportee)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; El Deportado, Texas-Mexican Border Music, Part I, Arhollie Records (Berkeley, 1975)

Author(s): Unidentified (Artist); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

A ballad, or corrido, from the time of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

Adios mi madre querida, Hechame su benedición, Ya me voy al extranjero, Donde no hay revolución. Goodbye my beloved mother, Give me your blessings, I am going abroad, Where there is no revolution.

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