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Title: Hopi Weaving

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of weaving among the Hopi.

The origins of Hopi weaving extend deep in time. For many centuries, Hopi men grew short-staple cotton that they spun into thread and then wove into fabric. They used an upright loom to weave blankets and cloth. The fabric was made into everyday clot...

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Title: Beautiful Valley

Source(s): Flaming Arrow’s People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo describes the valley around Acoma Pueblo.

Then the road leads you through very beautiful scenery. It is a valley road. It leads through forests of juniper pine and piñon trees, sometimes through an alkaline stretch of valley, again into the forests, and on the edge of the valleys are towers...

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Title: Turkey Makes the Corn and Coyote Plants It

Source(s): American Indian Myths and Legends

Author(s): Traditional; Richard Erdoes (Editor); Alfonso Ortiz (Editor)

Turkey teaches people how to grow corn, but Coyote doesn't learn the lesson.

Long ago when all the animals talked like people, Turkey overheard a boy begging his sister for food. “What does your little brother want?” he asked the girl. “He’s hungry, but we have nothing to eat,” she said. When Turkey heard this...

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Title: Closing the Trail, An Encounter between the People of Tusayan and the Spaniards

Source(s): Pueblos Abandoned in Historic Times; Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 9

Author(s): George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor); Albert H. Schroeder (Author)

In 1540 the people of Tusayan (also Tucayan, Tucano, and Tuzan), living in seven terraced Pueblos (possibly including two Jeddito Valley Pueblos that might have been abandoned prior to the 1580s) larger than those of Cibola (Zuni), approached the Spa...

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Title: La Yarda de la Escuelita

Source(s): Voces: An Anthology of Nuevo Mexicano Writers

Author(s): José Montoya (Author); Rudolfo A. Anaya (Editor)

A poem about a child’s schoolyard, in Spanish only.

La escuelita al pie del monte Es chica, así es que Los niños vienen en varios tamaños, Unos pequeños y ya en el libro ocho Otros altos, galgos Y apenas en el tercero. Alrededor de la maestra. Acurrucados de miedo—como pollitos— Se a...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

Hilda Faunce writes about her life at a trading post before the first World War (1914-1918). In this passage, she describes a terrible smallpox epidemic on the reservation.

I never should have supposed I could be calm in a smallpox epidemic. It came upon us suddenly and almost immediately dozens of our friends and customers were dead. The Indians came to the post with their bodies covered with sores; they lay down o...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

An Anglo woman writes about her life on a trading post on the Navajo reservation before WW I.

I was glad enough for an excuse to go into a hogan and especially the Old Lady’s. I started right after breakfast. Ken said any hour at all was visiting hour for Indians, so it could be for me too. I had studied the outside of the Navajo homes from...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Results Found: 8