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Title: Zuni

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction to Zuni

The Zuni, who call themselves A'shiwi, tell the story that long ago their gods cut off the peoples' tails, split the webs between their toes with stone knives, and led them from the underworld to seek their home in the center of the universe. When at...

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Title: The Wedding of the Louse and the Nit

Source(s): La Musica de los Viejitos: Hispano Folk Music of the Rio Grande del Norte

Author(s): Abade Martinez, arranger (Musician); Jack Loeffler (Editor)

A song the conquistadores may have sung as they marched to New Mexico.

The louse and the nit were going to be wed, but marry they couldn't, because there was no bread. chorus: Dee-da-la, dee-da-la, dee-da la dee-da-la, dee-da-la,dee-da-dam A cow calls out, from her corral “Carry on with the wedding, sinc...

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Title: Hopi Storytelling

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief description of Hopi storytelling practices.

In Hopi, a good storyteller is described as a tuwut’smoki. This word means something like “story bag”—someone who collects and remembers stories from a long and rich oral tradition. Hopi storytellers often begin their stories by saying ...

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Title: Zuni-Land in 1882

Source(s): Harper’s Magazine; WPA New Mexico Collections

Author(s): Sylvester Baxter (Author); B. W. Kenney (WPA Field Writer)

Traveler Sylvester Baxter describes the pueblo of Zuni as it appeared in 1882.

We finally reached Zuni at noon. The pueblo lies at the foot of the majestic Thunder Mountain. Close by flows the Zuni River. It is but a trickling stream in the dry season, but becomes a torrent in the rainy seasons. Because of flooding, the pueblo ...

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Title: The Rio Grande Watershed - Keresan

Source(s): Keresan (program 7); The Spirit of Place

Author(s): Jack Loeffler (Oral Historian); Elaine Thatcher (Oral Historian)

Programs 7, 8 & 9 address the Rio Grande del Norte and feature voices of Keresan Indians, Tewa Indians and Hispanos who have traditionally sustained themselves in small communities throughout the watershed. Featured participants: Harold Littlebird...

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Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

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Title: On Story

Source(s): Writing the Southwest

Author(s): Simon Ortiz (Author); David King Dunaway (Editor); Sara L. Spurgeon (Editor)

A noted Acoma author on the importance of storytelling and poetry to life.

Everything is a story, in the sense that the tradition out of which poetry and song comes is like the story of the life of a people. That is, the culture survives because of the story of its birth, and goes on into its development and to the end of a...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Holding Up the Cliff

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Abbott Sekaquaptewa (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

How Grasshopper outwits the hungry Coyote.

Coyote was living out there south of Oraibi, and one day he was going around looking for something to eat when he saw a grasshopper clinging to the base of a cliff. Coyote thought the grasshopper looked very peculiar, with its legs against the cliff ...

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