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Title: The Vengeance of Gouyen

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Eve Ball (Author); Nora Henn (Author); Lynda A. Sanchez

The widow Gouyen seeks revenge against a Comanche chief for killing her husband.

The Apache girl lay in the brush arbor of her mother-in-law waiting for the older woman to sleep. Her name is one the Apaches are forbidden to mention and she is known today only as Gouyen, Wise Woman, a term reserved only for the intelligent and cha...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Maasaw niqw Orayvit Naatsawinaya (How Maasaw and the People of Oraibi Got Scared to Death Once)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. People were living in Oraibi. Not far from the village, at Mastupatsa, was Maasaw’s home, where he lived with his grandmother. Every night when the villagers went to bed, he inspected the area around Oraibi. In this way he guarded the O...

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Title: Martyrdom of the Blessed Father

Source(s): Fray Alonso de Benavides' Revised Memorial of 1634

Author(s): Fray Francisco de Porras, at Moqui (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

How Fray Francisco de Porras cured a blind boy through prayer, and converted many of the Moqui Indians.

From the time this blessed father [Fray Francisco de Porras] took holy orders in San Francisco de México, he had been a religious of exemplary life. For this reason, the order retained him as master of novices for so many years that they considered ...

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Title: The Rescue of Two Mexican Boys

Source(s): Life Among the Apaches

Author(s): John C. Cremony (Author)

An American traveling with the band of Apache chief Mangas Colorado helps to free two young Mexican captives.

It has already been stated that my tent was pitched several hundred yards from the rest of the Commission, and hidden from the view of my companions by an intervening hillock. This fact rendered me far more cautious than I otherwise would have been. ...

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Title: La Hormiguita (The Little Ant)

Source(s): The Day It Snowed Tortillas: Tales from Spanish New Mexico

Author(s): Traditional (Author); Joe Hayes (Author)

Storyteller Joe Hayes rewrites a traditional Hispanic folk tale.

All through the long, cold winter La Hormiguita, the little ant, had to stay inside her underground home because the ground was all covered with snow. But now the snow was melted, so she went to the door with her mother to see if spring had come....

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Title: Salt of the Earth

Author(s): Michael Wilson (Author); Deborah S. Rosenfelt (Author); Michael Wilson (Author)

This script for a movie describes staging a strike by Mexican-American workers against the Empire Zinc Mine in Hanover, New Mexico, 1950-1952. The strike really happened, and the movie made it famous.

Medium shot: the first truck. The Anglo scabs standing in the back of the truck react in fear and consternation. But they stay where they are. Medium long shot: miners on hillside. A group of them start coming down the hill. We can see Charley an...

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Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

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Results Found: 8