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Title: Zuni-Land in 1882

Source(s): Harper’s Magazine; WPA New Mexico Collections

Author(s): Sylvester Baxter (Author); B. W. Kenney (WPA Field Writer)

Traveler Sylvester Baxter describes the pueblo of Zuni as it appeared in 1882.

We finally reached Zuni at noon. The pueblo lies at the foot of the majestic Thunder Mountain. Close by flows the Zuni River. It is but a trickling stream in the dry season, but becomes a torrent in the rainy seasons. Because of flooding, the pueblo ...

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Title: Santo Domingo Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo Indians Making Bread

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Pueblo Indians Making Bread, Santo Domingo, N. M.

Santo Domingo is an interesting and old-fashioned pueblo, built on the east bank of the Rio Grande, in New Mexico. In the four broad and dirty streets may be seen the huge outdoor ovens shown in the picture, often with heaps of firewood piled near t...

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Title: Alabados

Source(s): Brothers of Light: The Penitentes of the Southwest

Author(s): Alice Corbin Henderson (Author)

A description of traditional Spanish alabados, or hymns, that the Penitentes sang during their rituals.

Parts of the Penitente ritual have an ancestry of great age. This is particularly true of the alabados, or hymns, patiently written down in small copybooks or transmitted by memory. In verse forms these alabados have the earmarks of Fifteenth- or Six...

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Title: La Yarda de la Escuelita

Source(s): Voces: An Anthology of Nuevo Mexicano Writers

Author(s): José Montoya (Author); Rudolfo A. Anaya (Editor)

A poem about a child’s schoolyard, in Spanish only.

La escuelita al pie del monte Es chica, así es que Los niños vienen en varios tamaños, Unos pequeños y ya en el libro ocho Otros altos, galgos Y apenas en el tercero. Alrededor de la maestra. Acurrucados de miedo—como pollitos— Se a...

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Title: Silver City Days and Billy’’s Mother

Source(s): They ““Knew” Billy the Kid: Interviews with Old-Time New Mexicans

Author(s): Louis Abraham (Author); Robert F. Kadlec (Editor); Mrs. Frances Totty (WPA Field Writer)

A childhood friend of Billy the Kid describes his mother, Mrs. Bill Antrim.

Mrs. Bill Antrim was a jolly Irish lady, full of life, and her fun and mischief. Mrs. Antrim could dance the Highland Fling as well as the best of the dancers. There were very few American boys in Silver City when the Antrims lived here, therefor...

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Title: El Venadito

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.- Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers

Author(s): José B. Cuellar (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

José B. Cuellar rewrote the lyrics of the second verse of this classic, two-hundred-year-old Mexican ballad, or corrido, to describe people’s experience crossing the US-Mexico today.

I’m a poor little deer who lives In the hills Since I’m not very tame, I don’t Come down during daylight By night little by little and into Your arms my dear I climbed the highest hill to See the plains Where eagles triumph, hawks...

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Title: Indian Traders: Recent Aspersions of Jake Morgan

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

A Navajo trader defends his profession against charges made by Jake Morgan, a former member of the Navajo Tribal Council.

The unwarranted attack on the traders to the Navajo Indians by Jake Morgan, former member of the Navajo tribal council, and the subsequent denial by the United Indian Traders Association, brings to an issue the status of the trader in Navajo affairs....

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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Title: Navajo Medicine Man Requests Christian Burial

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

The death of Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah; description of his Christian burial and traditional Navajo ceremonies.

Gallup, N.M., March 4, 1937 (AP)—Hosteen Klah, powerful Navajo shaman, master of a thousand pagan chants, was buried Wednesday with Christian ceremonies. Only in death did Klah, regarded by all his tribe as the most powerful of medicine men, for...

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