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Title: Two Lives for Oñate

Author(s): Miguel Encinias (Author)

An excerpt from a novel about Juan de Oñate's campaign to conquer New Mexico in 1598-99.

On 12 January 1599, Zaldívar set out for Acoma with seventy soldiers and instructions to demand the delivery of those guilty for the attack on the Spaniards and, failing to achieve that, to wage relentless war and to take all of the inhabitants pris...

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Title: How the Hopis Got Fire

Source(s): Hopi Animal Stories

Author(s): Ekkehart Malotki (Author); Michael Lomatuway'ma, Lorena Lomatuway'ma, and Sidney Namingha (narrators) (Performer)

Aliksa’i. Long ago when the Hopis first arrived in this area, it used to get very cold at night and they were freezing and miserable. In the mornings, as they looked east, they would see smoke rising in the air. There had to be fire somewhere, so t...

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Title: A Conference with General Crook

Source(s): The Truth About Geronimo

Author(s): Britton Davis (Author)

The transcript of a conference between US Army General Crook and Apache leader Geronimo in 1886.

CONFERENCE held March 25 and 27, 1886, at Cañon De Los Embudos (Cañon of the Funnels), 20 Miles SSE of San Bernardino Springs, Mexico, Between General Crook and the Hostile Chiricahua Chiefs. First Day. PRESENT: Geronimo, Catle, Chihuahua, Na...

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Title: How Don Pedro de Tovar Discovered Tusayan

Source(s): The Journey of Coronado 1540-1542; (Chapter XI)

Author(s): George Parker Winship (Editor)

How Don Pedro de Tovar discovered Tusayan or Tutahaco and Don García López de Cárdenas saw the Firebrand River and the other things that happened. While the things already described were taking place, Cíbola being at peace, the General Francis...

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Title: The Four Worlds and the Emergence

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village, August 1969 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

From what I learned from the old-timers about the underworld and how the people emerged into this last world, they weren’t people in the First World, they were what you might call just creatures, bugs. Finally some good spirit turned them into diff...

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Title: Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography

Author(s): Walter Dyk (Author)

A detailed description by Walt Dyk of how prayers and songs were handed on, from father to (in this case) nephew.

That winter, while we lived on Black Mountain at Willows Coming Out, Who Has Mules came to our place. I was out herding. When I returned with the sheep towards evening he came out of the hogan and rode away. He’d been with my father all day; they m...

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Title: Yo sé que viví muy a gusto [I Know I Lived Very Comfortably]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco Valley

Author(s): Taida Sánchez-García (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico. Taida Sánchez-García describes living on a ranch and growing and conserving chiles and other foods.

Well, the rancher’s life was such that everybody had to work for themselves. Because that’s just the way it was over there [in Guadalupe]. Everyone worked for themselves with whatever they had: corn, pinto beans, or whatever you planted. That was...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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Title: La Llorona [The Wailing Woman]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Damiano Romero (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Damiano Romero of the Río Puerco Valley tells his version of the traditional legend of La Llorona (the Wailing Woman).

Well I don’t believe there was such a thing as the Wailing Woman, but many people claimed that it was the Wailing Woman. I used to spend a lot of time in the countryside, and one night there was a cry. It seemed like the cry of a lion; it resembled...

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Title: The Woman at Otowi Crossing

Author(s): Frank Waters (Author)

An excerpt from a novel about the making of the first atomic bomb at Los Alamos and its detonation at White Sands.

This is it, thought Gaylord working in the blinding brilliance of the July sun. Trinity, when he first had heard it, was only a Top-Secret operational code name. Then, when more and more men began to leave Los Alamos and he himself accompanied them, ...

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