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Title: Oraibi Before the Split

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Homer Cooyama, Kikeuchmovi, July 1970 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

A Hopi elder tells how the conflict between the Hostiles and the Friendlies within Oraibi society destroyed their ancient religion.

Before the split, Old Oraibi was a very complicated society. We were involved with different organizations, with fraternities, with groups (comparable to) the Masons, many things we don’t know too much about today. There were fourteen kivas in Old ...

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Title: Agarró nomás la Cuarto [He Just Grabbed the Whip]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Eduardo Valdez (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico, including Eduardo Valdez, who remembers the early days and the best cowboy around, Don Teodoro.

This Don Teodoro, and several others, not only him, because there were several horsemen there in Guadalupe, they say one day they penned up a herd of horses in a corral. And long ago they used to put two long poles on the corral and then they'd put a...

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Title: Bola Adentro! [There Goes the Ball!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Solomón “Sal” Lovato (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico. Their stories are rich in the lore and traditions of their culture and time. Solomón “Sal” Lovato describes an old time courting tradition.

And then there’s another thing they used to do, according to my grandfather. Whenever [the boy’s parents] would go to ask for a girl’s hand in marriage, if the man wanted to marry her, they [the father usually] would toss the ball inside, insid...

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Title: Penitentes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief description of the Penitente Brotherhood and the Hispano communities it served.

During the 1600s and 1700s, Hispano settlers in present-day New Mexico lived in small isolated poblaciones, or communities. They built adobe houses, dug acequias (irrigation ditches), and planted their crops along these ditches. The settlers lived in...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

Hilda Faunce writes about her life at a trading post before the first World War (1914-1918). In this passage, she describes a terrible smallpox epidemic on the reservation.

I never should have supposed I could be calm in a smallpox epidemic. It came upon us suddenly and almost immediately dozens of our friends and customers were dead. The Indians came to the post with their bodies covered with sores; they lay down o...

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Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

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Title: The Apache Diaries: A Father-Son Journey (excerpts)

Author(s): Grenville Goodwin (Author); Neil Goodwin (Author)

Neil Goodwin retraces the steps of his father, anthropologist Grenville Goodwin, who tried to find Chiricahua Apache groups living in the Sierra Madre of Mexico.

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Results Found: 7