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Results Found: 8
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Title: 1910

Source(s): Chants

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about discrimination along the Texas-Mexico border.

In Mexico they bowed their heads when she passed. Timid villagers stepped aside for the Judge's mother, Doña Luz, who wore her black shawl, black gloves whenever she left her home— at the church, the mercado, and the plaza in th...

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Title: Acoma Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Acoma pottery in the past and today.

From earliest times, Pueblo Indian potters have made ceramic pots for practical daily use. Pueblo people carried, cooked, and stored water and food in pottery. They also used it for ceremonial purposes. The exceptional quality of Acoma pottery made i...

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Title: Nampeyo

Source(s): The Legacy of a Master Potter, Nampeyo and Her Descendants

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author); Mary Ellen (Editor); Lawrence Blair (Editor)

It is impossible to state what a potter receives. The method of marketing operates very unfavorably to the potter. The villages are very remote from the market; consequently the whole output is disposed of to Tom Pavatea, the local trader, in return ...

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Title: Cattle-Rustling

Source(s): Horse-Breaking and Cattle-Rustling; Recollections of a Western Ranchman

Author(s): Captain William French (Author)

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

About this time, in the year 1895, there was really beginning to be some demand for cattle. There were rumors of people being in the country and actually desirous of contracting for their purchase several months in advance of the date of their delive...

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Title: To the Country of the People

Source(s): Traders to the Navajo: The Story of the Wetherills at Kayenta

Author(s): Francis Gilmore (Author); Louisa Wade Wetherill (Author)

Louisa and John Wetherill open a trading post on the Navajo reservation in the early 1900s.

....[O]nce more Louisa heard the names of the places they had seen with a strange longing in her heart. A country where there were no white men. A country where the scattered hogans of the people were the only dwelling places. A country from whic...

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6doc image icon

Title: Life at Wide Ruins

Source(s): Wide Ruins

Author(s): Sallie R. Wagner (Author)

Sallie Wagner writes of her days running a trading post with her husband on the Navajo reservation in the 1930s and 1940s.

It took some months for the people to decide that it might be all right to trade with us. The test came when Bent Knee arrived to take a deerskin out of pawn and found that the skin was still in the building. It was the custom, when selling a post, t...

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Title: Rugs for Trade or Cash

Source(s): Wide Ruins

Author(s): Sallie R. Wagner (Author)

Sallie Wagner writes of her days running a trading post with her husband on the Navajo reservation in the 1930s and 1940s.

When my husband and I bought the trading post, the Navajos in the area were making very poor rugs, the kind that were sold from knocked-together stands along Highway 66. The wool was not well cleaned or well spun. The bordered designs were the kind t...

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8doc image icon

Title: Indian Traders: Recent Aspersions of Jake Morgan

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

A Navajo trader defends his profession against charges made by Jake Morgan, a former member of the Navajo Tribal Council.

The unwarranted attack on the traders to the Navajo Indians by Jake Morgan, former member of the Navajo tribal council, and the subsequent denial by the United Indian Traders Association, brings to an issue the status of the trader in Navajo affairs....

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Results Found: 8