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Title: 1910

Source(s): Chants

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about discrimination along the Texas-Mexico border.

In Mexico they bowed their heads when she passed. Timid villagers stepped aside for the Judge's mother, Doña Luz, who wore her black shawl, black gloves whenever she left her home— at the church, the mercado, and the plaza in th...

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Title: Why Ants Are So Thin

Source(s): Kachina Tales from the Indian Pueblos

Author(s): Gene Meany Hodge (Author)

The Hopis say that ants are so thin in the middle of their bodies because they were almost cut in two by the Whipping Katsinas at an initiation.

The busy little Ant village in Hopiland was busier than ever, for the great Ant Chief had told everyone that in four days all the little Ant children between the ages of seven and eleven would be made members of the Katsina Society. The mothers were ...

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Title: Calling the Sun to Rise

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Louis Numkena, Sr. (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

The people were living over there at Old Oraibi, a long time ago, before there was any New Oraibi. North of Oraibi a couple of miles are some ruins, and Coyote was living there when this story happened. He was out hunting very early one morning befor...

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Title: Maasaw niqw Orayvit Naatsawinaya (How Maasaw and the People of Oraibi Got Scared to Death Once)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. People were living in Oraibi. Not far from the village, at Mastupatsa, was Maasaw’s home, where he lived with his grandmother. Every night when the villagers went to bed, he inspected the area around Oraibi. In this way he guarded the O...

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Title: The Rescue of Two Mexican Boys

Source(s): Life Among the Apaches

Author(s): John C. Cremony (Author)

An American traveling with the band of Apache chief Mangas Colorado helps to free two young Mexican captives.

It has already been stated that my tent was pitched several hundred yards from the rest of the Commission, and hidden from the view of my companions by an intervening hillock. This fact rendered me far more cautious than I otherwise would have been. ...

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Title: Palöngawhoya Soy Niina (How Palöngawhoya Killed His Grandmother)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. They were living at Pöqangwwawarpi. The Pöqangwhoya twins had their house there. The brothers were little boys. Pöqangwhoya was the older’s name; the younger was called Palöngawhoya. They had only their grandmother to live with, and a...

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Title: The Creation of Man

Source(s): Myths and Tales of the Jicarilla Apache Indians

Author(s): Traditional; Morris Opler (Editor)

How Hactcin created human beings.

In the beginning the dog was just like a Hactcin in appearance. This was because the Hactcin made everything. He was listless, however, and didn’t do anything. And Hactcin noticed this and spoke to him. He said, “Why don’t you do something? ...

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Title: Saquavicha, The Fox-Girl

Source(s): The Indian Leader, March 3, 1911, Native American Women’s Writing c. 1800-1924, an Anthology

Author(s): Clara Talavenska Keshoitewa, Hopi (Author); Karen L. Kilcup (Editor)

Two girls, in love with the same boy, change each other into animals. Spider woman helps sort things out.

Once upon a time there lived at Oraibi, two young girls who were in love with a handsome boy that lived near them. The girl Saquavicha, who lived to the east of his home, married him, and when Palavicha heard of it she was jealous. While Saquavich...

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Title: The Legend of Swift Wind

Source(s): Apache Legends: Songs of the Wind Dancer

Author(s): Lou Cuevas (Author); Lou Cuevas (Author)

The tale of a boy who, transformed into a roadrunner, saves his people from wolves.

Many ages ago, when the land belonged to the ancient Ndee, later known as the Apache, the Swift Wind story came into being. Since then, some have forgotten the tale, some do not understand it. Even today, among many clans, there are few who know of i...

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Title: Navajo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Navajo history: early migration from Alaska and Canada to encounters with the Spanish and war with the United States; concludes with an account of contemporary Navajo life.

Traditional Navajo, or Diné, stories tell that First Man, First Woman, the Holy People, and all the animals had to pass through three different worlds before emerging into the Fourth or Glittering World. Here, the People saw four rivers bounded by f...

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