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Title: Early Life

Source(s): Geronimo: His Own Story

Author(s): Geronimo (Author); S. M. Barrett (Oral Historian)

Famed Chiricahua Apache war chief Geronimo speaks of his childhood and how a boy becomes a warrior. As Told to S. M. Barrett.

I was born in No-doyohn Cañon, Arizona, June, 1829. In that country which lies around the headwaters of the Gila River I was reared. This range was our fatherland; among these mountains our wigwams were hidden; the scattered valleys contained our fi...

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Title: The Vengeance of Gouyen

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Eve Ball (Author); Nora Henn (Author); Lynda A. Sanchez

The widow Gouyen seeks revenge against a Comanche chief for killing her husband.

The Apache girl lay in the brush arbor of her mother-in-law waiting for the older woman to sleep. Her name is one the Apaches are forbidden to mention and she is known today only as Gouyen, Wise Woman, a term reserved only for the intelligent and cha...

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Title: Fray Juan Ramírez Comes to Acoma

Source(s): K’atsina: A Novel of Rebellion

Author(s): Lana M. Harrigan (Author)

A novelist's depiction of the arrival of Fray Juan Ramírez in Acoma Pueblo in 1629.

That night Juan Ramírez wrapped himself in a coarse woolen blanket and lay down on the hard ground where he would build his house of worship. He was glad the governor and his entourage had departed. The Acoma had taken down baskets of corn, a few...

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Title: Trading in the Americas

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief overview of trading in the Americas.

For hundreds of years, indigenous people of the American Southwest, whether on the move or in permanent settlements, traded among themselves. Archeologists have found shells from the Pacific Ocean, parrot feathers from Mexico, and turquoise from dist...

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Title: A Mexican War

Author(s): Captain William French (Author); Recollections of a Western Ranchman

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

After Thanksgiving we settled down to our usual routine. Things were going along smoothly when one afternoon we were startled by a messenger from our friends at the SU (ranch). This man brought word that there was trouble between the Mexicans and the...

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Title: Cattle-Rustling

Source(s): Horse-Breaking and Cattle-Rustling; Recollections of a Western Ranchman

Author(s): Captain William French (Author)

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

About this time, in the year 1895, there was really beginning to be some demand for cattle. There were rumors of people being in the country and actually desirous of contracting for their purchase several months in advance of the date of their delive...

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Title: Mangas Coloradas

Source(s): Whitewater Gila; Gila Descending: A Southwestern Journey

Author(s): M. H. Salmon (Author)

A contemporary reflection on Mangas Coloradas and how the Apaches encountered General Kearney’s Army in 1846.

In 1846 General Kearney's Army of the West traveled the length of the Gila River on the way to the conquest of California, part of the American government's self-made Mexican War. Lt. William Emory was the scribe and natural historian of the party. K...

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Title: For Georgia O’Keeffe

Source(s): My Own True Name: New and Selected Poems for Young Adults 1984-1999

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

The poet responds to the paintings of Southwestern artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986).

I want To walk With you on my Texas desert, To stand near You straight As a Spanish Dagger, To see your fingers Pick a bone bouquet Touching life Where I touch death, To hold a warm, white Pelvis up In the glaring sun And see Your red-b...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Results Found: 9