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Title: How the World Began

Source(s): When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away

Author(s): Ramon A. Gutíerrez (Author)

A noted scholar tells the story of how the world began according to the people of Acoma.

In the beginning two females were born underneath the earth at a place called Shipapu. In total darkness Tsichtinako (Thought Woman) nursed the sisters, taught them language and gave them each a basket that their father Uchtsiti had sent them contain...

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Title: The Four Worlds and the Emergence

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village, August 1969 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

From what I learned from the old-timers about the underworld and how the people emerged into this last world, they weren’t people in the First World, they were what you might call just creatures, bugs. Finally some good spirit turned them into diff...

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Title: Navajo Code Talkers

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

During World War II, many Navajos serving in the Marine Corps worked as “code talkers,” using a code in the Navajo language that the Japanese forces could not break for relaying information between US troops.

Although the United States government finally granted citizenship to Native Americans in 1924, the states of New Mexico and Arizona denied native people the right to vote until 1948. Nevertheless, during World War I (1917-1919) many Native Americans,...

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Title: El Venadito

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.- Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers

Author(s): José B. Cuellar (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

José B. Cuellar rewrote the lyrics of the second verse of this classic, two-hundred-year-old Mexican ballad, or corrido, to describe people’s experience crossing the US-Mexico today.

I’m a poor little deer who lives In the hills Since I’m not very tame, I don’t Come down during daylight By night little by little and into Your arms my dear I climbed the highest hill to See the plains Where eagles triumph, hawks...

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Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

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Results Found: 5