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Title: The Rescue of Two Mexican Boys

Source(s): Life Among the Apaches

Author(s): John C. Cremony (Author)

An American traveling with the band of Apache chief Mangas Colorado helps to free two young Mexican captives.

It has already been stated that my tent was pitched several hundred yards from the rest of the Commission, and hidden from the view of my companions by an intervening hillock. This fact rendered me far more cautious than I otherwise would have been. ...

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Title: Hopi Religion and the Missionaries

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

We old-timers can see that there has been a steady drift away from our traditional attitude toward nature and the universe. What I’m talking about is not the dancing and the kiva paraphernalia, all those visible things. They are only a means of exp...

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Title: The Legend of Swift Wind

Source(s): Apache Legends: Songs of the Wind Dancer

Author(s): Lou Cuevas (Author); Lou Cuevas (Author)

The tale of a boy who, transformed into a roadrunner, saves his people from wolves.

Many ages ago, when the land belonged to the ancient Ndee, later known as the Apache, the Swift Wind story came into being. Since then, some have forgotten the tale, some do not understand it. Even today, among many clans, there are few who know of i...

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Title: Silver City Days and Billy’’s Mother

Source(s): They ““Knew” Billy the Kid: Interviews with Old-Time New Mexicans

Author(s): Louis Abraham (Author); Robert F. Kadlec (Editor); Mrs. Frances Totty (WPA Field Writer)

A childhood friend of Billy the Kid describes his mother, Mrs. Bill Antrim.

Mrs. Bill Antrim was a jolly Irish lady, full of life, and her fun and mischief. Mrs. Antrim could dance the Highland Fling as well as the best of the dancers. There were very few American boys in Silver City when the Antrims lived here, therefor...

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Title: Navajo Code Talkers

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

During World War II, many Navajos serving in the Marine Corps worked as “code talkers,” using a code in the Navajo language that the Japanese forces could not break for relaying information between US troops.

Although the United States government finally granted citizenship to Native Americans in 1924, the states of New Mexico and Arizona denied native people the right to vote until 1948. Nevertheless, during World War I (1917-1919) many Native Americans,...

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Title: The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women

Source(s): Dark and Perfect Angels

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz writes about the Tarahumaran women who beg in the streets of Juarez along the U.S.-Mexico border.

1991. The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women They sit, ubiquitous, more numerous than mangos at the market. These women raise their children on the street—raise them To the dawn from their ungiving beds (cement is hard but it is free). ...

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Results Found: 6