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Title: Castañeda's History of the Expedition

Source(s): The Journey of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado 1540-1542; Coronado Cuarto Centennial Publications, 1540-1940

Author(s): Pedro de Castañeda (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

How the Zunis kill the negro Esteban at Cibola, and how Fray Marcos flees in flight.

CHAPTER III — How they killed the negro Esteban at Cíbola, and how Fray Marcos returned in flight. When Esteban got away from the said friars, he craved to gain honor and fame in everything and to be credited with the boldness and daring of dis...

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Title: Barboncito’s Speech to General Sherman at Fort Sumner

Source(s): Dinétah: An Early History of the Navajo People

Author(s): Barboncito (Author); Lawrence D. Sundberg (Author)

The Navajo leader Barboncito tells General Sherman to release the Navajos from captivity at Fort Sumner.

Bringing us here has made many of us die, also a great number of our animals. Our Grandfathers had no idea of living in any other place except our own land, and I don't think it is right for us to do what we were taught not to do. When the Navajo wer...

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Title: Alvarado’s Route

Source(s): Narratives of the Coronado Expedition 1540-1542

Author(s): Don Hernando Alvarado (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

An account of Don Hernando Alvarado’s travels among the Pueblos in 1540.

“We came to an old edifice resembling a fortress; a league farther on we found another one, and a little farther on still another. Beyond these we came to an ancient city, quite large but all in ruins, although a considerable portion of the wall, w...

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Title: Two Lives for Oñate

Author(s): Miguel Encinias (Author)

An excerpt from a novel about Juan de Oñate's campaign to conquer New Mexico in 1598-99.

On 12 January 1599, Zaldívar set out for Acoma with seventy soldiers and instructions to demand the delivery of those guilty for the attack on the Spaniards and, failing to achieve that, to wage relentless war and to take all of the inhabitants pris...

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Title: The Spanish Siege at Acoma

Source(s): Flaming Arrow’’s People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo describes the terrible Spanish siege at Acoma in the 1590s.

On the top of the cliff to the south is the old Spanish church which the Spanish fathers forced my people to build by carrying the adobe dirt from the valley below in their shawls, on their backs, up that steep climb. The walls of the church are seve...

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Title: Solomon Bibo

Source(s): Trail Dust

Author(s): Marc Simmons (Author)

Historian Marc Simmons sketches the life of Solomon Bibo, a German Jewish American who served as Governor of Acoma Pueblo.

Solomon Bibo, born in German Prussia in 1853, was one of eleven children. Right after our Civil War (1861-1865), two older Bibo brothers, Nathan and Simon, immigrated to the United States. They came to Santa Fe, where Nathan worked for the Spiegel...

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Title: Last Living Apache Scout

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Big Mouth (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Big Mouth describes the defeat and imprisonment of his people at Fort Sumner.

I am Big Mouth, last living scout of the Apache wars. I served in the campaigns against Victorio and Geronimo. I do not know my exact age, but I was six or seven years old when my people, the Mescalero Apaches, were forced into captivity at Fort Sumn...

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Title: Chester Arthur Tells about How the Navajo Were Corralled

Source(s): The Navajo Indians

Author(s): Chester Arthur (Author); Dane Coolidge (Author); Mary Roberts Coolidge (Author)

An account of the destruction of Navajo crops, livestock and lives by the U.S. Army under Colonel Kit Carson (Red Shirt).

That frightened the young men and they fled, but the soldiers did not come back. At first the Navajos were afraid and watched the trails, but as summer came on with lots of rain, they went back to their old homes and planted corn. Even around Fort De...

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Title: Dinétah - Manuelito

Source(s): Dinétah: An Early History of the Navajo People

Author(s): Manuelito (Author); Lawrence D. Sundberg (Author)

A quote from Manuelito, a leader of the Dineh people, on their release from Fort Sumner.

“When we saw the top of the mountain from Albuquerque, we wondered if it was our mountain, and we felt like talking to the ground, we loved it so. Some of the old men and women cried with joy when they reached their homes.”

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Title: Trading in the Americas

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief overview of trading in the Americas.

For hundreds of years, indigenous people of the American Southwest, whether on the move or in permanent settlements, traded among themselves. Archeologists have found shells from the Pacific Ocean, parrot feathers from Mexico, and turquoise from dist...

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