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Title: Report Finds Mine Could Harm Sacred Lake

Author(s): Ben Neary, Santa Fe New Mexican (Author)

Santa Fe New Mexican article on the Zuni effort to preserve the Salt Lake for religious purposes

An Arizona power company’s plan to pump groundwater for a huge coal mine in western New Mexico could harm a lake sacred to Zuni Pueblo, a new hydrology report commissioned by the pueblo says. For years, Zuni Pueblo has opposed plans by the S...

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Title: How the World Began

Source(s): When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away

Author(s): Ramon A. Gutíerrez (Author)

A noted scholar tells the story of how the world began according to the people of Acoma.

In the beginning two females were born underneath the earth at a place called Shipapu. In total darkness Tsichtinako (Thought Woman) nursed the sisters, taught them language and gave them each a basket that their father Uchtsiti had sent them contain...

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Title: Maasaw niqw Orayvit Naatsawinaya (How Maasaw and the People of Oraibi Got Scared to Death Once)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. People were living in Oraibi. Not far from the village, at Mastupatsa, was Maasaw’s home, where he lived with his grandmother. Every night when the villagers went to bed, he inspected the area around Oraibi. In this way he guarded the O...

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Title: How the Spaniards Came to Shung-opovi, How They Built a Mission, and How the Hopi Destroyed the Mission

Source(s): Truth of a Hopi

Author(s): Edmund Nequatewa (Author)

It may have taken quite a long time for these villages to be established. Anyway, every place was pretty well settled down when the Spanish came. The Spanish were first heard of at Zuni and then at Awatovi. They came on to Shung-opovi, passing Walpi....

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Title: Palöngawhoya Soy Niina (How Palöngawhoya Killed His Grandmother)

Source(s): Hopitutuwutsi Hopi Tales: A Bilingual Collection of Hopi Indian Stories

Author(s): Herschel Talashoma (Author); Ekkehart Malotki (Author)

Aliksa’i. They were living at Pöqangwwawarpi. The Pöqangwhoya twins had their house there. The brothers were little boys. Pöqangwhoya was the older’s name; the younger was called Palöngawhoya. They had only their grandmother to live with, and a...

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Title: Apache Mothers and Daughters: Four Generations of a Family

Author(s): Ruth McDonald Boyer (Author); Narcissus Duffy Gayton (Author)

Remembrances of an Apache elder woman.

Between the times of battle the family traveled throughout Tchihéné lands and beyond. Usually it was in quest of plant foods or game, but whatever their reason, the journeys provided Dilth-cleyhen’s maternal kin time to inform the youngster more ...

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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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Results Found: 7