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Title: Corn

Source(s): The Zuni Indians and Their Uses of Plants

Author(s): Matilda Coxe Stevenson (Author)

Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson describes the many ways in which Zuni people use corn.

Though not indigenous to the United States, corn was the staple food of the inhabitants of the Southwest long before the coming of the Spaniards in the middle of the sixteenth century, having been brought to this section either by peoples migrating f...

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Title: Fray Juan Ramírez Comes to Acoma

Source(s): K’atsina: A Novel of Rebellion

Author(s): Lana M. Harrigan (Author)

A novelist's depiction of the arrival of Fray Juan Ramírez in Acoma Pueblo in 1629.

That night Juan Ramírez wrapped himself in a coarse woolen blanket and lay down on the hard ground where he would build his house of worship. He was glad the governor and his entourage had departed. The Acoma had taken down baskets of corn, a few...

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Title: Closing the Trail, An Encounter between the People of Tusayan and the Spaniards

Source(s): Pueblos Abandoned in Historic Times; Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 9

Author(s): George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor); Albert H. Schroeder (Author)

In 1540 the people of Tusayan (also Tucayan, Tucano, and Tuzan), living in seven terraced Pueblos (possibly including two Jeddito Valley Pueblos that might have been abandoned prior to the 1580s) larger than those of Cibola (Zuni), approached the Spa...

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Title: The San Carlos Apache Reservation

Source(s): The Truth about Geronimo

Author(s): Britton Davis (Author)

US Army lieutenant Britton Davis describes the terrible conditions Apaches endured at the San Carlos Reservation.

Of the five thousand Indians on the White Mountain Reservation, about four thousand were at or near the Agency at San Carlos, depending for food on the government rations doled out to them there. Some two hundred of the chiefs and principal men assem...

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Title: Bosque Redondo

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Ferguson (Author)

A description of the Navajo people’s forced exile to Bosque Redondo in 1864.

At the end of February 1864, General Carleton reported the surrender of over three thousand Navajos, more than half the tribe. He demanded food and clothing for them all, and while waiting for Washington to act, he put his troops on half rations and ...

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Title: Something

Source(s): Sofia Poems

Author(s): Joan Logghe (Author)

A poem about Sephardic Jews in New Mexico.

Sofia had a secret even Sofia didn’t know. Something about candles at night, no taste of pork in her grandmother’s house. Something. Shadowed memory of her grandmother in her dark bedroom, her voice nearly a whisper. It passes down through the...

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Title: Yo sé que viví muy a gusto [I Know I Lived Very Comfortably]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco Valley

Author(s): Taida Sánchez-García (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico. Taida Sánchez-García describes living on a ranch and growing and conserving chiles and other foods.

Well, the rancher’s life was such that everybody had to work for themselves. Because that’s just the way it was over there [in Guadalupe]. Everyone worked for themselves with whatever they had: corn, pinto beans, or whatever you planted. That was...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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Title: Woodstove of My Childhood

Source(s): In the Gathering Silence

Author(s): Levi Romero (Author)

A poet describes the woodstove that heated his childhood home in northern New Mexico.

woodstove of my childhood where potatoes cut like triangle chips were fried in manteca de marrano woodstove of lazy autumn smoke swirling away to nowhere woodstove of December evacuating the cold chill at sunrise woodstove of celebrati...

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Title: Trading in the Americas

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief overview of trading in the Americas.

For hundreds of years, indigenous people of the American Southwest, whether on the move or in permanent settlements, traded among themselves. Archeologists have found shells from the Pacific Ocean, parrot feathers from Mexico, and turquoise from dist...

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