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Title: Expedition into New Mexico Made by Antonio de Espejo 1582-1583 as Revealed in the Journal of Diego Pérez de Luxan, a Member of the Party

Author(s): Diego Pérez de Luxan (Author); George Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

A merchant from New Spain journeys north as head of a relief party to find two Franciscan monks. Here he describes what his party found at Zuni.

We set out from this place on the fourteenth of the month and marched a league. We halted at the first pueblo of the province of Zuni which they called Malaque, in which we had a row of houses (for our use), and they gave us to eat of what they had u...

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Title: Cattle

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Daklugie (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Daklugie describes how he became a cattle rancher and dealt with some rustlers.

So I took over. The government had given the prisoners a start in cattle, and in one year some of the men had become fairly good at handling them. All were good horsemen, but they had to learn how to rope and to flank calves. I had not done that eith...

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Title: Coyote Fights a Lump of Pitch

Source(s): American Indian Myths and Legends

Author(s): Traditional; Richard Erdoes (Editor); Alfonso Ortiz (Editor)

Coyote tries to fight a lump of pitch and gets captured by a white man.

Even long ago, when our tribe and animals and birds lived together near white people, Coyote was always in trouble. He would visit among the camps, staying in one for a while and then moving on, and when he stayed at Bear’s camp, he used to go over...

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Title: Navajo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Navajo history: early migration from Alaska and Canada to encounters with the Spanish and war with the United States; concludes with an account of contemporary Navajo life.

Traditional Navajo, or Diné, stories tell that First Man, First Woman, the Holy People, and all the animals had to pass through three different worlds before emerging into the Fourth or Glittering World. Here, the People saw four rivers bounded by f...

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Title: Mesa Verde Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Dismantled Towers and Turrets Broken; Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Mesa Verde National Park is in the southwest corner of Colorado. The word mesa means table. Mesa Verde is 15 miles long and 8 miles wide. At its foot are piles of broken rocks, which rise to a height of 500 feet above the bare plains. Mesa Verde rise...

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Title: Agarró nomás la Cuarto [He Just Grabbed the Whip]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Eduardo Valdez (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico, including Eduardo Valdez, who remembers the early days and the best cowboy around, Don Teodoro.

This Don Teodoro, and several others, not only him, because there were several horsemen there in Guadalupe, they say one day they penned up a herd of horses in a corral. And long ago they used to put two long poles on the corral and then they'd put a...

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Title: El Milagro del Santo Niño [The Miracle of the Santo Niño]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Edumenio “Ed” Lovato (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Edumenio “Ed” Lovato tells a story of the days when Indians captured Hispano children from outlying villages and carried them away.

Rafael’s sister, Candelaria, was a proud possessor of a small statue of the Santo Niño de Atocha [Holy Child of Atocha]. From childhood she had developed an ardent devotion for the Child Jesus, following the example of her mother, who was also a f...

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Title: The Mimbres

Source(s): Whitewater Gila; Gila Descending: A Southwestern Journey

Author(s): M. H. Salmon (Author)

A contemporary reflection on the Mimbres people who once lived in Southwestern New Mexico.

They had come into these valleys as tattered bands just ages ago. They were afoot, the entirety of the forced simplicity of their lives contained in the packs on their backs. And they had, most likely, come up from the south, off the harsh deserts of...

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Title: Abiquiu

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A short history of Abiquiu and its peoples, including genizaros in the 1700s.

The village of Abiquiu lies in the Chama River Valley on high ground above the Chama River. People made their homes in the Chama River Valley for at least 5,000 years before the establishment of this village in the 1700s. We know this because we find...

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Title: The Utes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Utes.

The Utes call themselves Nunt’z, “the people.” In former times, the Utes roamed in eleven bands across much of Colorado, Utah, and parts of Arizona and New Mexico. Today they live on reservations in southern Colorado and eastern Utah. As many a...

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