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Title: Horse-Breaking

Source(s): Recollections of a Western Ranchman; Horse-Breaking and Cattle-Rustling

Author(s): Captain William French (Author)

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

When I got down, there were two or three [horses] in the corral in various phases of being roped and saddled with their prospective riders attending to them. The rest of the outfit were seated on the gate or in its neighborhood, and amongst them I re...

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Title: Whitewater Gila

Source(s): Gila Descending: A Southwestern Journey

Author(s): M. H. Salmon (Author)

The author canoes down the Gila River of New Mexico and Arizona with his dog and his cat.

I hadn’t been close to a canoe or held a paddle in my hands for many years. The first thing I did was misjudge the current and was nearly swept into the pilings under the East Fork Bridge. Recovering in time (“steady all”) I waved my paddle at ...

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Title: Dear Brother

Source(s): Columbus, NM: Queen of the Mimbres Valley

Author(s): Mrs. Sarah Hoover (Author); Ray Sherdell Page (Author)

A letter dated March 12, 1916, from a resident of Columbus, New Mexico, to her brother in Kansas, describing Pancho Villa’s raid on the town.

Dear Brother: We have had a most terrible battle here and we were all in the thickest of it. The bullets all came through the windows, they could not penetrate the adobe walls, but went through both walls of the hall and dining room and into Will...

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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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Results Found: 4