DocumentsImages
Results Found: 16
Matching Keywords: designs [ ? ] Search Help
See 40 Image Results
Content Information
1doc image icon

Title: Zuni Pottery Designs

Source(s): The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

Zuni pottery designs.

The Deer’s House (nawe awan k”yakwenne) Use: On the body of water jars or the interior of bowls. “We paint the deer so that our husbands can have good luck hunting. Deerskins are so expensive we cannot buy them anymore, and so we like to have ...

Show Keywords:

2doc image icon

Title: The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

A Pueblo potter explains how to teach a girl to make a pot.

When a girl starts to make a jar, I should tell her to take a handful of clay about the size of a cup, and to work it in her hands, using two fingers, until it is like a cup. Then she should put it in a mold and roll strips of clay about as thick as ...

Show Keywords:

3doc image icon

Title: Zuni Silver

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction of silversmithing to the Southwest and Zunis.

The introduction of silver and silversmithing among the Indians in the Southwest dates from the middle of the 1800s. Mexican traders first introduced the Navajo to silver. Like pottery, migrations and trade among peoples spread jewelry-making designs...

Show Keywords:

4doc image icon

Title: Lanyade

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): John Adair (Author)

The first Zuni silversmith was a man named Lanyade. He tells this story at the age of 95.

When I was a young man about thirty years old [1872], a Navajo came to Zuni who knew how to make silver. This man’s Navajo name was Atsidi Chon. I had traveled through the Navajo country a good many times, on my way to the Hopi villages, and I knew ...

Show Keywords:

5doc image icon

Title: The Journey of Fray Marcos de Niza

Source(s): The Journey of Fray Marcos de Niza

Author(s): Fray Marcos de Niza (Author); Cleve Hallenbeck (Editor)

What happens when Fray Marcos de Niza sends Estevan the Spanish Moor as advance scout in search of the golden Cities of Cibola in 1539.

On another route I sent Estevan de Dorantes, the black, whom I instructed to follow to the north for fifty or sixty leagues, to see if by that route he would be able to learn of any great thing such as we sought; and I agreed with him that if he rece...

Show Keywords:

6doc image icon

Title: Hopi

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to and overview of the Hopi material in Southwest Crossroads.

The villages of Hopi are the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in North America. Oraibi, the oldest village, dates back to about 1125 A.D. Present-day Hopis live in thirteen villages on and around three mesas in northern Arizona. For hundr...

Show Keywords:

7doc image icon

Title: Hopi Silver

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

How the Hopis came to be silversmiths.

Silversmithing in the American Southwest tells a story of creative encounters among peoples. The Navajos probably learned the art of silversmithing from Mexican artisans. Oral tradition recalls that a Navajo taught silversmithing to a Zuni man named ...

Show Keywords:

8doc image icon

Title: Awat’ovi Kiva Murals

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Discussion of the kiva murals found at Awat'ovi Pueblo.

The Hopis lived in the village of Awat’ovi on Antelope Mesa from about 1200 AD until its destruction in 1700. Between 1300 and 1600 AD Hopi artisans painted dozens of large murals in the village kiva, one on top of another. Between 1935 and 1939...

Show Keywords:

9doc image icon

Title: Acoma Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Acoma pottery in the past and today.

From earliest times, Pueblo Indian potters have made ceramic pots for practical daily use. Pueblo people carried, cooked, and stored water and food in pottery. They also used it for ceremonial purposes. The exceptional quality of Acoma pottery made i...

Show Keywords:

10doc image icon

Title: Acoma Pottery Design Motifs

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of bread bowls and an explanation of common design motifs.

Bread Bowls When the Spaniards introduced wheat and various fruits and vegetables to the Southwest, the Acomas and Lagunas began to need new sizes and shapes of vessels for food preparation and storage. One of these was the large dough bowl, up to 1...

Show Keywords:

Results Found: 16 1 2 Next