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Title: Zuni Salt Lake through the Lens of Time

Source(s): The Beautiful and the Dangerous

Author(s): Barbara Tedlock (Author)

Barbara Tedlock's description of Hapiya praying at the Salt Lake.

Hapiya stood at the end of a wooden plank someone had abandoned between the salt mine and cinder cones. He stooped down, made a hole at his feet, and then straightened up, facing east, to begin a long prayer. Near the end of the prayer he bent to ...

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Title: Coronado

Source(s): The Winter Road

Author(s): Louis Jenkins (Author)

Poet Louis Jenkins tells of Coronado's confrontation with the Zunis.

Coronado came up from Mexico in search of the life of the imagination. The Zunis said “Oh God, here comes Coronado and those Spaniards.” The Zunis drew a line on the ground with cornmeal and said “OK Coronado cross that line and you'll be sorry...

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Title: Corn

Source(s): The Zuni Indians and Their Uses of Plants

Author(s): Matilda Coxe Stevenson (Author)

Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson describes the many ways in which Zuni people use corn.

Though not indigenous to the United States, corn was the staple food of the inhabitants of the Southwest long before the coming of the Spaniards in the middle of the sixteenth century, having been brought to this section either by peoples migrating f...

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Title: Alvarado’s Route

Source(s): Narratives of the Coronado Expedition 1540-1542

Author(s): Don Hernando Alvarado (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

An account of Don Hernando Alvarado’s travels among the Pueblos in 1540.

“We came to an old edifice resembling a fortress; a league farther on we found another one, and a little farther on still another. Beyond these we came to an ancient city, quite large but all in ruins, although a considerable portion of the wall, w...

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Title: How the World Began

Source(s): When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away

Author(s): Ramon A. Gutíerrez (Author)

A noted scholar tells the story of how the world began according to the people of Acoma.

In the beginning two females were born underneath the earth at a place called Shipapu. In total darkness Tsichtinako (Thought Woman) nursed the sisters, taught them language and gave them each a basket that their father Uchtsiti had sent them contain...

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Title: Uncle Tells a Story

Source(s): Writing the Southwest

Author(s): Simon Ortiz (Author); David King Dunaway (Editor); Sara L. Spurgeon (Editor)

Uncle Page talks about the last time he went hunting.

“Uncle, tell us a story,” people would say, “Tell us about the time you went to the mountains to hunt.” And the old man, Page, would say, “Well, I don’t really want to; I don’t have any stories.” “Please, Uncle,” they would ...

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Title: The Flaming Arrow Katsina

Source(s): Flaming Arrow's People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo tells the story of the katsina whose name he bears.

This is the story of the Katsina for whom I was named. It happened that the Sun had a boy born on the earth. The life of this boy came to his mother by the Sun’s rays shining through the gypsum rock window, and when the boy grew up he looked sha...

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Title: Why Ants Are So Thin

Source(s): Kachina Tales from the Indian Pueblos

Author(s): Gene Meany Hodge (Author)

The Hopis say that ants are so thin in the middle of their bodies because they were almost cut in two by the Whipping Katsinas at an initiation.

The busy little Ant village in Hopiland was busier than ever, for the great Ant Chief had told everyone that in four days all the little Ant children between the ages of seven and eleven would be made members of the Katsina Society. The mothers were ...

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Title: The Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

In time, a long time, the warning rattling is heard and the antelope priests appear, walking quickly. They repeat the evolution of the day before, and their costumes are the same, but the effect somehow is much more tense. The whole crowd is held sil...

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Results Found: 9