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Title: Zuni

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction to Zuni

The Zuni, who call themselves A'shiwi, tell the story that long ago their gods cut off the peoples' tails, split the webs between their toes with stone knives, and led them from the underworld to seek their home in the center of the universe. When at...

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Title: Hopi

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to and overview of the Hopi material in Southwest Crossroads.

The villages of Hopi are the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in North America. Oraibi, the oldest village, dates back to about 1125 A.D. Present-day Hopis live in thirteen villages on and around three mesas in northern Arizona. For hundr...

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Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

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Title: Teshuvah

Source(s): Another Desert: Jewish Poetry of New Mexico

Author(s): Isabelle Medina Sandoval (Author); Joan Logghe (Editor); Miriam Sagan (Editor)

A poem about Jews exiled from Spain who came to New Mexico.

Glad tidings Cousin Rabbi blood of my blood of Spain. Many years more than forty years my family lived in the Sinai Desert without a temple to pray. Many years more than four hundred years my family lived in the deserts of Mexico withou...

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Title: Fray Juan Ramírez Comes to Acoma

Source(s): K’atsina: A Novel of Rebellion

Author(s): Lana M. Harrigan (Author)

A novelist's depiction of the arrival of Fray Juan Ramírez in Acoma Pueblo in 1629.

That night Juan Ramírez wrapped himself in a coarse woolen blanket and lay down on the hard ground where he would build his house of worship. He was glad the governor and his entourage had departed. The Acoma had taken down baskets of corn, a few...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Martyrdom of the Blessed Father

Source(s): Fray Alonso de Benavides' Revised Memorial of 1634

Author(s): Fray Francisco de Porras, at Moqui (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

How Fray Francisco de Porras cured a blind boy through prayer, and converted many of the Moqui Indians.

From the time this blessed father [Fray Francisco de Porras] took holy orders in San Francisco de México, he had been a religious of exemplary life. For this reason, the order retained him as master of novices for so many years that they considered ...

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Title: The Moqui Nation

Source(s): Fray Alonso de Benavides’ Revised Memorial of 1634

Author(s): Fray Alonso de Benavides (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

An account of how Fray Francisco de Porras arrived at Hopi and established the mission of San Bernardo.

Traveling another thirty leagues in the same westward direction, one reaches the province and nation of Moqui [Hopi], which is of the same character as the above- mentioned Zuni, both in products and climate; it has also ten thousand souls. They diff...

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Title: Oraibi Before the Split

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Homer Cooyama, Kikeuchmovi, July 1970 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

A Hopi elder tells how the conflict between the Hostiles and the Friendlies within Oraibi society destroyed their ancient religion.

Before the split, Old Oraibi was a very complicated society. We were involved with different organizations, with fraternities, with groups (comparable to) the Masons, many things we don’t know too much about today. There were fourteen kivas in Old ...

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Title: Hopi Religion and the Missionaries

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

We old-timers can see that there has been a steady drift away from our traditional attitude toward nature and the universe. What I’m talking about is not the dancing and the kiva paraphernalia, all those visible things. They are only a means of exp...

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