DocumentsImages
Results Found: 66
Matching Keywords: conditions [ ? ] Search Help
Content Information
1doc image icon

Title: Zuni-Land in 1882

Source(s): Harper’s Magazine; WPA New Mexico Collections

Author(s): Sylvester Baxter (Author); B. W. Kenney (WPA Field Writer)

Traveler Sylvester Baxter describes the pueblo of Zuni as it appeared in 1882.

We finally reached Zuni at noon. The pueblo lies at the foot of the majestic Thunder Mountain. Close by flows the Zuni River. It is but a trickling stream in the dry season, but becomes a torrent in the rainy seasons. Because of flooding, the pueblo ...

Show Keywords:

2doc image icon

Title: Silver City Days and Billy’’s Mother

Source(s): They ““Knew” Billy the Kid: Interviews with Old-Time New Mexicans

Author(s): Louis Abraham (Author); Robert F. Kadlec (Editor); Mrs. Frances Totty (WPA Field Writer)

A childhood friend of Billy the Kid describes his mother, Mrs. Bill Antrim.

Mrs. Bill Antrim was a jolly Irish lady, full of life, and her fun and mischief. Mrs. Antrim could dance the Highland Fling as well as the best of the dancers. There were very few American boys in Silver City when the Antrims lived here, therefor...

Show Keywords:

3doc image icon

Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

Show Keywords:

4doc image icon

Title: Los Betabeleros (The Beet-field Workers)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; Mexican Immigration to the United States

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

A Mexican ballad, or corrido, describing the fate of the people who went to work in the beet fields.

In the year 1923 Of the present era The beet-field workers went To that Michigan weeping, Because all the bosses Began to scold, And Don Santiago says to them: “I want to return Because they haven’t done for us What they said they would....

Show Keywords:

5doc image icon

Title: Crossing the Border

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A short history of border crossings between the United States and Mexico.

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo defined the border between the United States and Mexico in 1848. Before that year, the region now called the American Southwest was part of Mexico. After the Mexican Revolution began in 1910, thousands of Mexicans m...

Show Keywords:

6doc image icon

Title: Work

Source(s): Elegies In Blue: Poems

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz dedicates the poem “Work” to the workers in the Juárez maquilas, factories along the US-Mexico border.

for the workers in the Juárez maquilas On the border, we live in a desert of translation. Our words are difficult and dry. How do you say rain? How do you say river? How do you say the sand on which I Walk is thirsty as a white sun? How do you...

Show Keywords:

7doc image icon

Title: Indian Traders: Recent Aspersions of Jake Morgan

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

A Navajo trader defends his profession against charges made by Jake Morgan, a former member of the Navajo Tribal Council.

The unwarranted attack on the traders to the Navajo Indians by Jake Morgan, former member of the Navajo tribal council, and the subsequent denial by the United Indian Traders Association, brings to an issue the status of the trader in Navajo affairs....

Show Keywords:

8doc image icon

Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

Show Keywords:

9doc image icon

Title: Navajo Customs

Author(s): Roy Dunn (Author)

Brief descriptions of Navajo customs or “superstitions.”

A Navajo will never burn ants or insects of any kind. A Navajo will never whistle at night. A Navajo will never go near a burial or hogan (home) where someone has died. It is a very old superstition of the Navajos not to comb their hair at n...

Show Keywords:

10doc image icon

Title: Navajo Medicine Man Requests Christian Burial

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

The death of Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah; description of his Christian burial and traditional Navajo ceremonies.

Gallup, N.M., March 4, 1937 (AP)—Hosteen Klah, powerful Navajo shaman, master of a thousand pagan chants, was buried Wednesday with Christian ceremonies. Only in death did Klah, regarded by all his tribe as the most powerful of medicine men, for...

Show Keywords:

Results Found: 66 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next