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Title: Carl Meets His Cousin-Brother

Source(s): Katzimo, Mysterious Mesa

Author(s): Bobette Bibo Gugliotta (Author)

The son of an Acoma mother and a German-Jewish father visits his mother's village for the first time and meets his cousin.

With a quick motion of his hand Horace indicated the path that the group was ascending. “Do you want to walk up the foot trail or do you want to climb the split trail?” He threw the choice at Carl like a challenge. Without hesitating Carl repl...

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Title: The Four Worlds and the Emergence

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village, August 1969 (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

From what I learned from the old-timers about the underworld and how the people emerged into this last world, they weren’t people in the First World, they were what you might call just creatures, bugs. Finally some good spirit turned them into diff...

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Title: Bead Springs

Source(s): Five Deer on Loco Mountain Road: People and Places on the Northern Edge of the Gila Wilderness

Author(s): Blanche M. Irving (Author)

Poem about a spring in the Gila wilderness that Apaches used to visit.

It is a spiritual experience to climb the trail and find this blue cup of water waiting. Apache warriors stopped far down the slope and laid aside their war gear; then climbed on to drop their ceremonial beads in this sun- ...

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Title: Desert Wife

Author(s): Hilda Faunce (Author)

An Anglo woman writes about her life on a trading post on the Navajo reservation before WW I.

I was glad enough for an excuse to go into a hogan and especially the Old Lady’s. I started right after breakfast. Ken said any hour at all was visiting hour for Indians, so it could be for me too. I had studied the outside of the Navajo homes from...

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Title: El Venadito

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.- Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers

Author(s): José B. Cuellar (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

José B. Cuellar rewrote the lyrics of the second verse of this classic, two-hundred-year-old Mexican ballad, or corrido, to describe people’s experience crossing the US-Mexico today.

I’m a poor little deer who lives In the hills Since I’m not very tame, I don’t Come down during daylight By night little by little and into Your arms my dear I climbed the highest hill to See the plains Where eagles triumph, hawks...

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Results Found: 5