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Title: Zuni Pottery Designs

Source(s): The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

Zuni pottery designs.

The Deer’s House (nawe awan k”yakwenne) Use: On the body of water jars or the interior of bowls. “We paint the deer so that our husbands can have good luck hunting. Deerskins are so expensive we cannot buy them anymore, and so we like to have ...

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Title: The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

A Pueblo potter explains how to teach a girl to make a pot.

When a girl starts to make a jar, I should tell her to take a handful of clay about the size of a cup, and to work it in her hands, using two fingers, until it is like a cup. Then she should put it in a mold and roll strips of clay about as thick as ...

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Title: Awat’ovi Kiva Murals

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Discussion of the kiva murals found at Awat'ovi Pueblo.

The Hopis lived in the village of Awat’ovi on Antelope Mesa from about 1200 AD until its destruction in 1700. Between 1300 and 1600 AD Hopi artisans painted dozens of large murals in the village kiva, one on top of another. Between 1935 and 1939...

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Title: The Origins of Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

When people started to make pottery and how it changed their societies.

Small bands of indigenous peoples roamed the American Southwest between 10,000 BCE and 1000 CE. They moved around following game and gathering whatever plants were in season. They may have carried their belongings and foodstuffs in baskets. Peopl...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Mesa Verde Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Dismantled Towers and Turrets Broken; Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Mesa Verde National Park is in the southwest corner of Colorado. The word mesa means table. Mesa Verde is 15 miles long and 8 miles wide. At its foot are piles of broken rocks, which rise to a height of 500 feet above the bare plains. Mesa Verde rise...

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Title: Taos Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo of Taos Indians

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

As in Ancient Days, Pueblo of the Taos Indians, Taos, N. Mex.

The Pueblo Indians of the Southwest were very different from those farther east and north. They were partially civilized and knew how to weave baskets and blankets and to make pottery. They are rather shorter and darker in color than other Indian...

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Title: I’ve Done My Bit on the Border

Source(s): Chapter Four: Revenge and Reprisal; Border Fury: A Picture Postcard Record of Mexico’s Revolution and U.S. War Preparedness, 1910-1917

Author(s): James J. Verhoeks (Author); Paul J. Vanderwood (Author); Frank N. Samponaro (Author)

A poem by a bugler in the 32nd Michigan Infantry, which served on the US-Mexico border in 1916.

I’ve done my bit on the border I wish I was in God’s country again I’ve had my fill of the border Of Greasers and border men I’ve eaten the dirt of Texas I’ve drank of the Rio Grande I’ve grubbed mesquite in the cursed heat (The Lo...

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Title: Work

Source(s): Elegies In Blue: Poems

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz dedicates the poem “Work” to the workers in the Juárez maquilas, factories along the US-Mexico border.

for the workers in the Juárez maquilas On the border, we live in a desert of translation. Our words are difficult and dry. How do you say rain? How do you say river? How do you say the sand on which I Walk is thirsty as a white sun? How do you...

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Results Found: 9