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Title: Muster Roll

Source(s): Majestic Journey: Coronado’s Inland Empire

Author(s): Stewart L. Udall (Author)

Before Coronado’s expedition into New Mexico, a muster roll was taken describing each traveler in detail.

We know a lot about events that day at Compostela— exactly 192 years before George Washington was born in 1732—because Don Antonio had issued an order that each soldier would pass before an inspector and declare his possessions. Thus, diligent sc...

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Title: Expedition into New Mexico Made by Antonio de Espejo 1582-1583 as Revealed in the Journal of Diego Pérez de Luxan, a Member of the Party

Author(s): Diego Pérez de Luxan (Author); George Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

A merchant from New Spain journeys north as head of a relief party to find two Franciscan monks. Here he describes what his party found at Zuni.

We set out from this place on the fourteenth of the month and marched a league. We halted at the first pueblo of the province of Zuni which they called Malaque, in which we had a row of houses (for our use), and they gave us to eat of what they had u...

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Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

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Title: Gaspar Villagrá and the Story of His Epic Adventure in the Upper Rio Grande

Source(s): Trail Dust

Author(s): Marc Simmons (Author); Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá (Author)

Historian Marc Simmons sketches the life of Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá, poet-historian of the Spanish conquest.

Captain Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá published an epic poem in 1610. Written in classical style, it was fashioned in imitation of the Aeneid by the Roman poet Virgil. The poem bore the rather colorless name, Historia de la Nueva Mexico. Villagrá is...

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Title: A Conference with General Crook

Source(s): The Truth About Geronimo

Author(s): Britton Davis (Author)

The transcript of a conference between US Army General Crook and Apache leader Geronimo in 1886.

CONFERENCE held March 25 and 27, 1886, at Cañon De Los Embudos (Cañon of the Funnels), 20 Miles SSE of San Bernardino Springs, Mexico, Between General Crook and the Hostile Chiricahua Chiefs. First Day. PRESENT: Geronimo, Catle, Chihuahua, Na...

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Title: How Don Pedro de Tovar Discovered Tusayan

Source(s): The Journey of Coronado 1540-1542; (Chapter XI)

Author(s): George Parker Winship (Editor)

How Don Pedro de Tovar discovered Tusayan or Tutahaco and Don García López de Cárdenas saw the Firebrand River and the other things that happened. While the things already described were taking place, Cíbola being at peace, the General Francis...

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Title: Closing the Trail, An Encounter between the People of Tusayan and the Spaniards

Source(s): Pueblos Abandoned in Historic Times; Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 9

Author(s): George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor); Albert H. Schroeder (Author)

In 1540 the people of Tusayan (also Tucayan, Tucano, and Tuzan), living in seven terraced Pueblos (possibly including two Jeddito Valley Pueblos that might have been abandoned prior to the 1580s) larger than those of Cibola (Zuni), approached the Spa...

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Title: Chester Arthur Tells about How the Navajo Were Corralled

Source(s): The Navajo Indians

Author(s): Chester Arthur (Author); Dane Coolidge (Author); Mary Roberts Coolidge (Author)

An account of the destruction of Navajo crops, livestock and lives by the U.S. Army under Colonel Kit Carson (Red Shirt).

That frightened the young men and they fled, but the soldiers did not come back. At first the Navajos were afraid and watched the trails, but as summer came on with lots of rain, they went back to their old homes and planted corn. Even around Fort De...

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Results Found: 8