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Title: Zuni Salt Lake through the Lens of Time

Source(s): The Beautiful and the Dangerous

Author(s): Barbara Tedlock (Author)

Barbara Tedlock's description of Hapiya praying at the Salt Lake.

Hapiya stood at the end of a wooden plank someone had abandoned between the salt mine and cinder cones. He stooped down, made a hole at his feet, and then straightened up, facing east, to begin a long prayer. Near the end of the prayer he bent to ...

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Title: The Wedding of the Louse and the Nit

Source(s): La Musica de los Viejitos: Hispano Folk Music of the Rio Grande del Norte

Author(s): Abade Martinez, arranger (Musician); Jack Loeffler (Editor)

A song the conquistadores may have sung as they marched to New Mexico.

The louse and the nit were going to be wed, but marry they couldn't, because there was no bread. chorus: Dee-da-la, dee-da-la, dee-da la dee-da-la, dee-da-la,dee-da-dam A cow calls out, from her corral “Carry on with the wedding, sinc...

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Title: Early Life

Source(s): Geronimo: His Own Story

Author(s): Geronimo (Author); S. M. Barrett (Oral Historian)

Famed Chiricahua Apache war chief Geronimo speaks of his childhood and how a boy becomes a warrior. As Told to S. M. Barrett.

I was born in No-doyohn Cañon, Arizona, June, 1829. In that country which lies around the headwaters of the Gila River I was reared. This range was our fatherland; among these mountains our wigwams were hidden; the scattered valleys contained our fi...

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Title: Corn

Source(s): The Zuni Indians and Their Uses of Plants

Author(s): Matilda Coxe Stevenson (Author)

Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson describes the many ways in which Zuni people use corn.

Though not indigenous to the United States, corn was the staple food of the inhabitants of the Southwest long before the coming of the Spaniards in the middle of the sixteenth century, having been brought to this section either by peoples migrating f...

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Title: Acoma Pottery Design Motifs

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of bread bowls and an explanation of common design motifs.

Bread Bowls When the Spaniards introduced wheat and various fruits and vegetables to the Southwest, the Acomas and Lagunas began to need new sizes and shapes of vessels for food preparation and storage. One of these was the large dough bowl, up to 1...

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Title: Coyote Fights a Lump of Pitch

Source(s): American Indian Myths and Legends

Author(s): Traditional; Richard Erdoes (Editor); Alfonso Ortiz (Editor)

Coyote tries to fight a lump of pitch and gets captured by a white man.

Even long ago, when our tribe and animals and birds lived together near white people, Coyote was always in trouble. He would visit among the camps, staying in one for a while and then moving on, and when he stayed at Bear’s camp, he used to go over...

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Title: Mesa Verde Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Dismantled Towers and Turrets Broken; Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Mesa Verde National Park is in the southwest corner of Colorado. The word mesa means table. Mesa Verde is 15 miles long and 8 miles wide. At its foot are piles of broken rocks, which rise to a height of 500 feet above the bare plains. Mesa Verde rise...

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Title: Santo Domingo Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo Indians Making Bread

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Pueblo Indians Making Bread, Santo Domingo, N. M.

Santo Domingo is an interesting and old-fashioned pueblo, built on the east bank of the Rio Grande, in New Mexico. In the four broad and dirty streets may be seen the huge outdoor ovens shown in the picture, often with heaps of firewood piled near t...

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Title: Yo sé que viví muy a gusto [I Know I Lived Very Comfortably]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco Valley

Author(s): Taida Sánchez-García (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico. Taida Sánchez-García describes living on a ranch and growing and conserving chiles and other foods.

Well, the rancher’s life was such that everybody had to work for themselves. Because that’s just the way it was over there [in Guadalupe]. Everyone worked for themselves with whatever they had: corn, pinto beans, or whatever you planted. That was...

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Title: To the Country of the People

Source(s): Traders to the Navajo: The Story of the Wetherills at Kayenta

Author(s): Francis Gilmore (Author); Louisa Wade Wetherill (Author)

Louisa and John Wetherill open a trading post on the Navajo reservation in the early 1900s.

....[O]nce more Louisa heard the names of the places they had seen with a strange longing in her heart. A country where there were no white men. A country where the scattered hogans of the people were the only dwelling places. A country from whic...

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