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Title: Zuni

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction to Zuni

The Zuni, who call themselves A'shiwi, tell the story that long ago their gods cut off the peoples' tails, split the webs between their toes with stone knives, and led them from the underworld to seek their home in the center of the universe. When at...

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Title: Lanyade

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): John Adair (Author)

The first Zuni silversmith was a man named Lanyade. He tells this story at the age of 95.

When I was a young man about thirty years old [1872], a Navajo came to Zuni who knew how to make silver. This man’s Navajo name was Atsidi Chon. I had traveled through the Navajo country a good many times, on my way to the Hopi villages, and I knew ...

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Title: How the World Began

Source(s): When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away

Author(s): Ramon A. Gutíerrez (Author)

A noted scholar tells the story of how the world began according to the people of Acoma.

In the beginning two females were born underneath the earth at a place called Shipapu. In total darkness Tsichtinako (Thought Woman) nursed the sisters, taught them language and gave them each a basket that their father Uchtsiti had sent them contain...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Hunting Lesson

Source(s): Childhood and Youth in Jicarilla Apache Society

Author(s): Traditional; Morris Opler (Editor)

How grandfathers teach their grandsons to be good hunters.

The grandfather goes out with the boy. They build a camp. That night the grandfather tells the boy how to hunt and advises him about what he cannot do. The grandfather, if he knows how, will take the upper foot pad [dewclaw] of the cougar, dry it,...

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Title: Closing the Trail, An Encounter between the People of Tusayan and the Spaniards

Source(s): Pueblos Abandoned in Historic Times; Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 9

Author(s): George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor); Albert H. Schroeder (Author)

In 1540 the people of Tusayan (also Tucayan, Tucano, and Tuzan), living in seven terraced Pueblos (possibly including two Jeddito Valley Pueblos that might have been abandoned prior to the 1580s) larger than those of Cibola (Zuni), approached the Spa...

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Title: Abiquiu

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A short history of Abiquiu and its peoples, including genizaros in the 1700s.

The village of Abiquiu lies in the Chama River Valley on high ground above the Chama River. People made their homes in the Chama River Valley for at least 5,000 years before the establishment of this village in the 1700s. We know this because we find...

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Title: The Utes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of the Utes.

The Utes call themselves Nunt’z, “the people.” In former times, the Utes roamed in eleven bands across much of Colorado, Utah, and parts of Arizona and New Mexico. Today they live on reservations in southern Colorado and eastern Utah. As many a...

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Title: Tierra Amarilla

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of Tierra Amarilla.

The village of Tierra Amarilla lies in the Chama River Valley. Groups of hunters and gatherers lived in this valley as far back as about 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists know about at least ten significant pueblo sites along the Chama River, between p...

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