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Title: Turquoise in the History of the Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Turquoise in the ancient Southwest

Throughout history, peoples around the world have revered turquoise for its beauty. Turquoise comes from the earth but is the color of the sky. Indians of the American Southwest associate the semi-precious stone with early tribal stories and prayer. ...

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Title: Turquoise Mining in the Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Turquoise mining among the Pueblos, Spanish, and Americans

Archaeologists have also found turquoise mines throughout Mesoamerica. One of the largest mines is in a mountain south of Santa Fe called Cuwimi Kai or Chalchihuitel—“a house inside which turquoise is found.” The Zuni often obtained...

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Title: Awat’ovi Kiva Murals

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Discussion of the kiva murals found at Awat'ovi Pueblo.

The Hopis lived in the village of Awat’ovi on Antelope Mesa from about 1200 AD until its destruction in 1700. Between 1300 and 1600 AD Hopi artisans painted dozens of large murals in the village kiva, one on top of another. Between 1935 and 1939...

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Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

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Title: Alvarado’s Route

Source(s): Narratives of the Coronado Expedition 1540-1542

Author(s): Don Hernando Alvarado (Author); George P. Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

An account of Don Hernando Alvarado’s travels among the Pueblos in 1540.

“We came to an old edifice resembling a fortress; a league farther on we found another one, and a little farther on still another. Beyond these we came to an ancient city, quite large but all in ruins, although a considerable portion of the wall, w...

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Title: Navajo Weaving: A Study in Cultural Change and Adaptability

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of Navajo weaving for individual use and for trade.

Navajos say Spider Woman taught them to weave with directions from Spider Man. Spider Woman’s woven cross still appears in Navajo weaving today. The early Navajos were a nomadic hunting and gathering people. Navajo weaving tells a story of their...

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Title: Tierra Amarilla

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of Tierra Amarilla.

The village of Tierra Amarilla lies in the Chama River Valley. Groups of hunters and gatherers lived in this valley as far back as about 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists know about at least ten significant pueblo sites along the Chama River, between p...

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Title: Trading in the Americas

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief overview of trading in the Americas.

For hundreds of years, indigenous people of the American Southwest, whether on the move or in permanent settlements, traded among themselves. Archeologists have found shells from the Pacific Ocean, parrot feathers from Mexico, and turquoise from dist...

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Title: The Pajarito Plateau and Los Alamos

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A description of the Pajarito Plateau and Los Alamos.

Millions of years ago the Jemez Mountains were formed by volcanic flows. Later eruptions of ash tuff, carved by wind and water, formed the Pajarito [Little Bird] Plateau on the east flank of the Jemez Mountains. The Rio Grande, flowing south through ...

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Results Found: 9