DocumentsImages
Results Found: 7
Matching Keywords: Walpi [ ? ] Search Help
See 6 Image Results
Content Information
1doc image icon

Title: First Mesa Pottery

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Dewey Healing (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

Some Hopis say they taught us Tewas in Tewa Village how to make pottery. That’s all wrong, of course. Tewas were making pottery back in Tsewageh before they came here. At one time the people on First Mesa had just about stopped making pottery altog...

Show Keywords:

2doc image icon

Title: How the Spaniards Came to Shung-opovi, How They Built a Mission, and How the Hopi Destroyed the Mission

Source(s): Truth of a Hopi

Author(s): Edmund Nequatewa (Author)

It may have taken quite a long time for these villages to be established. Anyway, every place was pretty well settled down when the Spanish came. The Spanish were first heard of at Zuni and then at Awatovi. They came on to Shung-opovi, passing Walpi....

Show Keywords:

3doc image icon

Title: The Pueblo Revolt Against the Spanish: A First Mesa Account

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava); Harold Courlander (Editor)

The village leaders and the people were always thinking about how they might get rid of the Castillas—that’s what they called the Spanish. Then one time they got word from the Eastern Pueblos that some kind of uprising was being planned. They sen...

Show Keywords:

4doc image icon

Title: About the Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Undoubtedly the Snake Dance is the most ancient ceremony we still may see, for it is the direct worship of the clan ancestor, who is the snake. [Anthropologist Jesse] Fewkes, who holds this opinion, says that the dance was also originally a water cer...

Show Keywords:

5doc image icon

Title: The Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

In time, a long time, the warning rattling is heard and the antelope priests appear, walking quickly. They repeat the evolution of the day before, and their costumes are the same, but the effect somehow is much more tense. The whole crowd is held sil...

Show Keywords:

6doc image icon

Title: The Snake Legend

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Once a chief’s son sat on the edge of the Grand Canyon, wondering where all that water went. He thought that he might be able to help his people if he should follow it; so, on the advice of his father, he built a boat, enclosed like a box, and set ...

Show Keywords:

7doc image icon

Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

Show Keywords:

Results Found: 7