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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Killer-of-Enemies

Source(s): Myths and Legends of the Lipan Apache Indians

Author(s): Traditional; Morris Opler (Editor)

Killer-of-Enemies creates a landscape and customs for the Lipan Apache people.

After Killer-of-Enemies left Big Owl’s place, he went out and fixed up other places too. Killer-of-Enemies also started to make rules for the human beings. He went out on a raid. His home was at the Guadalupe Mountains. From there he went out to th...

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Title: White Eyes

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Philemon Venego (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Philemon Venego describes what his people thought of whites when they first saw them.

Though I live on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, I am a Lipan. We were that branch of the Apaches who roamed, for the greater part of the time, east of the Rio Pecos and claimed all of that land to the Gulf of Mexico. Our rights were disputed by ot...

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Title: A Voice

Source(s): My Own True Name: New and Selected Poems for Young Adults

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem describing the narrator’s mother’s struggle to learn English.

Even the lights on the stage unrelenting as the desert sun couldn’t hide the other students, their eyes also unrelenting, students who spoke English every night as they ate their meat, potatoes, gravy. Not you. In your house that smelled lik...

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Title: Tierra Amarilla

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of Tierra Amarilla.

The village of Tierra Amarilla lies in the Chama River Valley. Groups of hunters and gatherers lived in this valley as far back as about 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists know about at least ten significant pueblo sites along the Chama River, between p...

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Title: A Mexican War

Author(s): Captain William French (Author); Recollections of a Western Ranchman

Recollections of ranching in southwestern New Mexico, near the town of Alma, 1883-1899.

After Thanksgiving we settled down to our usual routine. Things were going along smoothly when one afternoon we were startled by a messenger from our friends at the SU (ranch). This man brought word that there was trouble between the Mexicans and the...

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Title: For Georgia O’Keeffe

Source(s): My Own True Name: New and Selected Poems for Young Adults 1984-1999

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

The poet responds to the paintings of Southwestern artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986).

I want To walk With you on my Texas desert, To stand near You straight As a Spanish Dagger, To see your fingers Pick a bone bouquet Touching life Where I touch death, To hold a warm, white Pelvis up In the glaring sun And see Your red-b...

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Title: Crossings

Source(s): Canícula

Author(s): Norma Elia Cantú (Author)

Author Norma Elia Cantú and her family have crossed the US-Mexico border many times to visit their relatives.

Bueli and Mami and Papi crossed the bridge on foot from one Laredo to the other; they took turns carrying me, or maybe only pushing my blue stroller. Chirinola, our dog, came too, papers and all. It was 1948. For Bueli the move brought back memories,...

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Title: I’ve Done My Bit on the Border

Source(s): Chapter Four: Revenge and Reprisal; Border Fury: A Picture Postcard Record of Mexico’s Revolution and U.S. War Preparedness, 1910-1917

Author(s): James J. Verhoeks (Author); Paul J. Vanderwood (Author); Frank N. Samponaro (Author)

A poem by a bugler in the 32nd Michigan Infantry, which served on the US-Mexico border in 1916.

I’ve done my bit on the border I wish I was in God’s country again I’ve had my fill of the border Of Greasers and border men I’ve eaten the dirt of Texas I’ve drank of the Rio Grande I’ve grubbed mesquite in the cursed heat (The Lo...

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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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