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Title: Zuni Encounters with Anthropologists

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Frank Cushing at Zuni Pueblo

Zuni Pueblo has been a crossroads in the American Southwest for hundreds of years. The Zuni world included encounters with neighboring and more distant tribes. The Zuni world expanded with the Spanish entradas beginning in the 1500s. It expanded stil...

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Title: Turquoise in the History of the Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Turquoise in the ancient Southwest

Throughout history, peoples around the world have revered turquoise for its beauty. Turquoise comes from the earth but is the color of the sky. Indians of the American Southwest associate the semi-precious stone with early tribal stories and prayer. ...

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Title: Zuni Pottery Designs

Source(s): The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

Zuni pottery designs.

The Deer’s House (nawe awan k”yakwenne) Use: On the body of water jars or the interior of bowls. “We paint the deer so that our husbands can have good luck hunting. Deerskins are so expensive we cannot buy them anymore, and so we like to have ...

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Title: Zuni Silver

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Introduction of silversmithing to the Southwest and Zunis.

The introduction of silver and silversmithing among the Indians in the Southwest dates from the middle of the 1800s. Mexican traders first introduced the Navajo to silver. Like pottery, migrations and trade among peoples spread jewelry-making designs...

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Title: Lanyade

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): John Adair (Author)

The first Zuni silversmith was a man named Lanyade. He tells this story at the age of 95.

When I was a young man about thirty years old [1872], a Navajo came to Zuni who knew how to make silver. This man’s Navajo name was Atsidi Chon. I had traveled through the Navajo country a good many times, on my way to the Hopi villages, and I knew ...

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Title: Hopi Weaving

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of weaving among the Hopi.

The origins of Hopi weaving extend deep in time. For many centuries, Hopi men grew short-staple cotton that they spun into thread and then wove into fabric. They used an upright loom to weave blankets and cloth. The fabric was made into everyday clot...

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Title: Corn

Source(s): The Zuni Indians and Their Uses of Plants

Author(s): Matilda Coxe Stevenson (Author)

Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson describes the many ways in which Zuni people use corn.

Though not indigenous to the United States, corn was the staple food of the inhabitants of the Southwest long before the coming of the Spaniards in the middle of the sixteenth century, having been brought to this section either by peoples migrating f...

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Title: The Rio Grande Watershed - Keresan

Source(s): Keresan (program 7); The Spirit of Place

Author(s): Jack Loeffler (Oral Historian); Elaine Thatcher (Oral Historian)

Programs 7, 8 & 9 address the Rio Grande del Norte and feature voices of Keresan Indians, Tewa Indians and Hispanos who have traditionally sustained themselves in small communities throughout the watershed. Featured participants: Harold Littlebird...

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Title: The Origins of Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

When people started to make pottery and how it changed their societies.

Small bands of indigenous peoples roamed the American Southwest between 10,000 BCE and 1000 CE. They moved around following game and gathering whatever plants were in season. They may have carried their belongings and foodstuffs in baskets. Peopl...

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Title: Acoma Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Acoma pottery in the past and today.

From earliest times, Pueblo Indian potters have made ceramic pots for practical daily use. Pueblo people carried, cooked, and stored water and food in pottery. They also used it for ceremonial purposes. The exceptional quality of Acoma pottery made i...

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