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Title: 1910

Source(s): Chants

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about discrimination along the Texas-Mexico border.

In Mexico they bowed their heads when she passed. Timid villagers stepped aside for the Judge's mother, Doña Luz, who wore her black shawl, black gloves whenever she left her home— at the church, the mercado, and the plaza in th...

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Title: The Rescue of Two Mexican Boys

Source(s): Life Among the Apaches

Author(s): John C. Cremony (Author)

An American traveling with the band of Apache chief Mangas Colorado helps to free two young Mexican captives.

It has already been stated that my tent was pitched several hundred yards from the rest of the Commission, and hidden from the view of my companions by an intervening hillock. This fact rendered me far more cautious than I otherwise would have been. ...

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Title: Border Town: 1938

Source(s): Borders

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about a child’s experience of racial segregation.

She counts cement cracks little Esperanza with the long brown braids, counts so as not to hear the girls in the playground singing, “the farmer's in the dell the farmer's in the dell” laughing and running round-round while little Esp...

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Title: The Apache Diaries: A Father-Son Journey (excerpts)

Author(s): Grenville Goodwin (Author); Neil Goodwin (Author)

Neil Goodwin retraces the steps of his father, anthropologist Grenville Goodwin, who tried to find Chiricahua Apache groups living in the Sierra Madre of Mexico.

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Title: Dear Brother

Source(s): Columbus, NM: Queen of the Mimbres Valley

Author(s): Mrs. Sarah Hoover (Author); Ray Sherdell Page (Author)

A letter dated March 12, 1916, from a resident of Columbus, New Mexico, to her brother in Kansas, describing Pancho Villa’s raid on the town.

Dear Brother: We have had a most terrible battle here and we were all in the thickest of it. The bullets all came through the windows, they could not penetrate the adobe walls, but went through both walls of the hall and dining room and into Will...

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Title: Catholic Treasure

Source(s): High Lonesome: The Vanishing American West

Author(s): Dayton Lummis (Author)

Poem describing buried treasure that Spanish colonists and Conquistadores are said to have left in the bootheel region of NM.

The creaking of the windmill, rhythmic splash of water into the brimming tank— the only sounds in the desert, a place called “High Lonesome;” down in the Bootheel, in the shadow of Animas Peak, the old boy smiled and said, “Catho...

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Title: Crossings

Source(s): Canícula

Author(s): Norma Elia Cantú (Author)

Author Norma Elia Cantú and her family have crossed the US-Mexico border many times to visit their relatives.

Bueli and Mami and Papi crossed the bridge on foot from one Laredo to the other; they took turns carrying me, or maybe only pushing my blue stroller. Chirinola, our dog, came too, papers and all. It was 1948. For Bueli the move brought back memories,...

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Title: El Corrido de Inmigrante (Ballad of an Immigrant)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; Mexican Voices/American Dreams: An Oral History of Mexican Immigration to the United States

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); Marilyn P. Davis

A Mexican ballad, or corrido, about how sad people are when they have to leave home to go to the United States.

Mexico, my homeland, where I was born, Give me the benediction of your powerful hand, I’m going to the United States to earn my living, Good-bye, my beloved country, I carry you in my heart, Don’t condemn me for leaving my country, Poverty a...

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Title: El Deportado (The Deportee)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; El Deportado, Texas-Mexican Border Music, Part I, Arhollie Records (Berkeley, 1975)

Author(s): Unidentified (Artist); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

A ballad, or corrido, from the time of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

Adios mi madre querida, Hechame su benedición, Ya me voy al extranjero, Donde no hay revolución. Goodbye my beloved mother, Give me your blessings, I am going abroad, Where there is no revolution.

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Title: El Venadito

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.- Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers

Author(s): José B. Cuellar (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

José B. Cuellar rewrote the lyrics of the second verse of this classic, two-hundred-year-old Mexican ballad, or corrido, to describe people’s experience crossing the US-Mexico today.

I’m a poor little deer who lives In the hills Since I’m not very tame, I don’t Come down during daylight By night little by little and into Your arms my dear I climbed the highest hill to See the plains Where eagles triumph, hawks...

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