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Title: Nampeyo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

How Nampeyo revived old design traditions among Hopi potters.

During the 1870s and 1880s, a young Hopi woman named Nampeyo searched for potsherds in the ancient village of Sikyatki on First Mesa. Nampeyo was the daughter of Qotca Ka-o (White Corn), who was a member of the Tewa Corn Clan. Her Hopi father was a ...

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Title: About the Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Undoubtedly the Snake Dance is the most ancient ceremony we still may see, for it is the direct worship of the clan ancestor, who is the snake. [Anthropologist Jesse] Fewkes, who holds this opinion, says that the dance was also originally a water cer...

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Title: The Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

In time, a long time, the warning rattling is heard and the antelope priests appear, walking quickly. They repeat the evolution of the day before, and their costumes are the same, but the effect somehow is much more tense. The whole crowd is held sil...

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Title: The Snake Legend

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Once a chief’s son sat on the edge of the Grand Canyon, wondering where all that water went. He thought that he might be able to help his people if he should follow it; so, on the advice of his father, he built a boat, enclosed like a box, and set ...

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Results Found: 4