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Title: Report Finds Mine Could Harm Sacred Lake

Author(s): Ben Neary, Santa Fe New Mexican (Author)

Santa Fe New Mexican article on the Zuni effort to preserve the Salt Lake for religious purposes

An Arizona power company’s plan to pump groundwater for a huge coal mine in western New Mexico could harm a lake sacred to Zuni Pueblo, a new hydrology report commissioned by the pueblo says. For years, Zuni Pueblo has opposed plans by the S...

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Title: Turquoise Mining in the Southwest

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Turquoise mining among the Pueblos, Spanish, and Americans

Archaeologists have also found turquoise mines throughout Mesoamerica. One of the largest mines is in a mountain south of Santa Fe called Cuwimi Kai or Chalchihuitel—“a house inside which turquoise is found.” The Zuni often obtained...

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Title: Keneshde Tells His Story

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): Keneshde (Author); John Adair (Author)

A Zuni silversmith tells how he got the first piece of turquoise when he was fifteen from a mine east of Santo Domingo.

When I was a boy about fifteen years old, I used to help Kwaisedemon, who was my grandfather, make silver. He was my father's father, and at that time he was an old man. It was hard work for him to pound out silver, so I used to do that for him. In r...

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Title: Hopi

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to and overview of the Hopi material in Southwest Crossroads.

The villages of Hopi are the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in North America. Oraibi, the oldest village, dates back to about 1125 A.D. Present-day Hopis live in thirteen villages on and around three mesas in northern Arizona. For hundr...

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Title: Katsinam

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The meaning and origin of katsina rituals.

Katsinam are Hopi spirit messengers who send prayers for rain, bountiful harvests, and a prosperous, healthy life for humankind. They are our friends and visitors who bring gifts and food, as well as messages to teach appropriate behavior and the con...

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Title: Hopi Weaving

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of weaving among the Hopi.

The origins of Hopi weaving extend deep in time. For many centuries, Hopi men grew short-staple cotton that they spun into thread and then wove into fabric. They used an upright loom to weave blankets and cloth. The fabric was made into everyday clot...

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Title: Coronado

Source(s): The Winter Road

Author(s): Louis Jenkins (Author)

Poet Louis Jenkins tells of Coronado's confrontation with the Zunis.

Coronado came up from Mexico in search of the life of the imagination. The Zunis said “Oh God, here comes Coronado and those Spaniards.” The Zunis drew a line on the ground with cornmeal and said “OK Coronado cross that line and you'll be sorry...

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Title: Revised Memorial of 1634

Author(s): Alonso Benavides (Author)

A description of Acoma by a prominent Spanish priest.

To the west of the Rio del Norte, at a distance of thirty leagues, lies the Peñon of Acoma, very famous for the many lives that it has cost both the Spaniards and the Indians. This was not only because it was impregnable but also because of the cour...

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Title: Going to Acoma

Source(s): Flaming Arrow’’s People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo describes the way from Albuquerque to Acoma.

If you go along the Santa Fe Trail about sixty-five miles west of Albuquerque, you will come to the ancient village of Laguna. These Laguna Indians used to belong to the tribe of Acoma Indians, but their ancestors quarreled in the olden days, and cam...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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