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Title: Hopi Weaving

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of weaving among the Hopi.

The origins of Hopi weaving extend deep in time. For many centuries, Hopi men grew short-staple cotton that they spun into thread and then wove into fabric. They used an upright loom to weave blankets and cloth. The fabric was made into everyday clot...

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Title: Navajo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Navajo history: early migration from Alaska and Canada to encounters with the Spanish and war with the United States; concludes with an account of contemporary Navajo life.

Traditional Navajo, or Diné, stories tell that First Man, First Woman, the Holy People, and all the animals had to pass through three different worlds before emerging into the Fourth or Glittering World. Here, the People saw four rivers bounded by f...

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Title: The Churro

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The introduction of churro sheep by the Spanish and their resulting importance to Navajo culture.

During the sixteenth century, the Spanish brought flocks of churro sheep to the Americas. The churro was an old and hardy breed originating in Spain. It could survive in rugged, dry terrain. Early Spanish, Pueblo, and Navajo weavers prized the long, ...

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Title: Agarró nomás la Cuarto [He Just Grabbed the Whip]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Eduardo Valdez (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico, including Eduardo Valdez, who remembers the early days and the best cowboy around, Don Teodoro.

This Don Teodoro, and several others, not only him, because there were several horsemen there in Guadalupe, they say one day they penned up a herd of horses in a corral. And long ago they used to put two long poles on the corral and then they'd put a...

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Title: Prefacio [Preface]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Sabine R. Ulibarrí (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

It is necessary to know where you come from to know where you are and what you are, in order to know where you are headed and who you will be. Nasario García knows very well where he comes from. That is why his road in life is well marked. Kindn...

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Title: Alabados

Source(s): Brothers of Light: The Penitentes of the Southwest

Author(s): Alice Corbin Henderson (Author)

A description of traditional Spanish alabados, or hymns, that the Penitentes sang during their rituals.

Parts of the Penitente ritual have an ancestry of great age. This is particularly true of the alabados, or hymns, patiently written down in small copybooks or transmitted by memory. In verse forms these alabados have the earmarks of Fifteenth- or Six...

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Title: Carretas del Muerto

Source(s): Brothers of Light: The Penitentes of the Southwest

Author(s): Alice Corbin Henderson (Author)

Alice Corbin Henderson describes the Penitente tradition of dragging the Carreta del Muerto in processions.

Finding our way back to the plaza, we stood in the shadow of one of the low adobe buildings, where we could watch the procession passing. It was now quite dark, except for half moonlight in a mottled sky. The bulk of the church looked against the edg...

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Title: Reies López Tijerina and the Tierra Amarilla Courthouse Raid

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A description of conflicts over land ownership in northern New Mexico. In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized the descendants of the original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their lands.

When the Spaniards claimed northern New Mexico as Spanish land in the 1600s, settlers from Spain and present-day Mexico formed ranching and farming communities on land long occupied by Native Americans. The Spanish authorities awarded land grants to ...

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Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

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Results Found: 9