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Title: Acoma

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the history and culture of the people of Acoma.

Tribal elders say that Acoma (sometimes spelled Akome, Acuo, Acuco, Ako and A’ku-me) means “a place that always was.” Archaeologists have found artifacts at digs on Acoma Mesa that speak of prehistoric times. Like its near neighbors Hopi and Zu...

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Title: Mesa Verde Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Dismantled Towers and Turrets Broken; Cliff Palace in the Mesa Verde, Colorado.

Mesa Verde National Park is in the southwest corner of Colorado. The word mesa means table. Mesa Verde is 15 miles long and 8 miles wide. At its foot are piles of broken rocks, which rise to a height of 500 feet above the bare plains. Mesa Verde rise...

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Title: Those Who Have Gone: Indians of Abiquiu

Source(s): Abiquiu and Don Cacahuate: A Folk History of a New Mexican Village

Author(s): Gilberto Benito Cordova (Author)

New Mexican historian Gilberto Benito Cordova writes about the early history of Abiquiu.

Close by the village of Abiquiu can be found today at least ten prehistoric Pueblo sites. Exactly when the first Indians moved into this area is not known, but an old Tewa of Santa Clara Pueblo, Aniceto Swaso, declared some years ago that his ancesto...

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Title: The Pajarito Plateau and Los Alamos

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A description of the Pajarito Plateau and Los Alamos.

Millions of years ago the Jemez Mountains were formed by volcanic flows. Later eruptions of ash tuff, carved by wind and water, formed the Pajarito [Little Bird] Plateau on the east flank of the Jemez Mountains. The Rio Grande, flowing south through ...

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Results Found: 4