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Title: Two Lives for Oñate

Author(s): Miguel Encinias (Author)

An excerpt from a novel about Juan de Oñate's campaign to conquer New Mexico in 1598-99.

On 12 January 1599, Zaldívar set out for Acoma with seventy soldiers and instructions to demand the delivery of those guilty for the attack on the Spaniards and, failing to achieve that, to wage relentless war and to take all of the inhabitants pris...

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Title: Fray Juan Ramírez Comes to Acoma

Source(s): K’atsina: A Novel of Rebellion

Author(s): Lana M. Harrigan (Author)

A novelist's depiction of the arrival of Fray Juan Ramírez in Acoma Pueblo in 1629.

That night Juan Ramírez wrapped himself in a coarse woolen blanket and lay down on the hard ground where he would build his house of worship. He was glad the governor and his entourage had departed. The Acoma had taken down baskets of corn, a few...

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Title: Something

Source(s): Sofia Poems

Author(s): Joan Logghe (Author)

A poem about Sephardic Jews in New Mexico.

Sofia had a secret even Sofia didn’t know. Something about candles at night, no taste of pork in her grandmother’s house. Something. Shadowed memory of her grandmother in her dark bedroom, her voice nearly a whisper. It passes down through the...

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Title: Penitentes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief description of the Penitente Brotherhood and the Hispano communities it served.

During the 1600s and 1700s, Hispano settlers in present-day New Mexico lived in small isolated poblaciones, or communities. They built adobe houses, dug acequias (irrigation ditches), and planted their crops along these ditches. The settlers lived in...

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Title: The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women

Source(s): Dark and Perfect Angels

Author(s): Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Author)

Poet Benjamin Alire Sáenz writes about the Tarahumaran women who beg in the streets of Juarez along the U.S.-Mexico border.

1991. The Streets of Juárez: Tarahumaran Women They sit, ubiquitous, more numerous than mangos at the market. These women raise their children on the street—raise them To the dawn from their ungiving beds (cement is hard but it is free). ...

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Results Found: 5