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Title: There’s What I Call A Triangular System Of Compadrasco

Author(s): Francisco Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Francisco Sisneros discusses his family who settled in the Abo area in the mid-nineteenth century.

The family moved from Casa Colorada on the Rio Grande up to the area of El Arroyo Colorado north of the Abo ruins in about 1854. Somewhere in between, during the time of the Civil War, we know that they were at La Salada, the area south of Abo. We do...

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Title: They Couldn’t Make Enough Money With The Cows That They Had

Author(s): Al Padilla and Joe Padilla (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Al and Joe Padilla describe being on their family’s homestead and the diverse ways people made a living.

Joe: See, my dad did all kinds of work. My dad worked for the railroad. He worked for that Sais Crusher, and also on construction of US 60 there. And the reason for that is because they couldn’t make enough money with the cows that they had. For so...

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Title: A Hundred And Fifty Dollars For A Section!

Author(s): Sylvestre Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Sylvestre Sisneros talks about the way his family homesteaded south of Abo ruins during the Depression.

Okay, there was about five sections south of Abo near Chupadero Mesa that they couldn’t dispose of it under the original Homestead Act (which only allowed 160 acres), because the land didn’t have any water. It was good grazing, but it was far ou...

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Results Found: 3