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Title: Acoma Pottery

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Acoma pottery in the past and today.

From earliest times, Pueblo Indian potters have made ceramic pots for practical daily use. Pueblo people carried, cooked, and stored water and food in pottery. They also used it for ceremonial purposes. The exceptional quality of Acoma pottery made i...

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Title: Wheat-Sprout

Source(s): Flaming Arrow’s People by an Acoma Indian

Author(s): James Paytiamo (Author)

James Paytiamo explains why his mother named him "Wheat-Sprout."

It was the wheat cutting time or, as the white people call it, August. The Acomas, my people's tribe, were down at the little irrigated valley, assisting each other to cut the wheat by hand. These wheat fields were small, and had been laboriously pla...

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Title: Solomon Bibo

Source(s): Trail Dust

Author(s): Marc Simmons (Author)

Historian Marc Simmons sketches the life of Solomon Bibo, a German Jewish American who served as Governor of Acoma Pueblo.

Solomon Bibo, born in German Prussia in 1853, was one of eleven children. Right after our Civil War (1861-1865), two older Bibo brothers, Nathan and Simon, immigrated to the United States. They came to Santa Fe, where Nathan worked for the Spiegel...

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Title: Santo Domingo Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo Indians Making Bread

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Pueblo Indians Making Bread, Santo Domingo, N. M.

Santo Domingo is an interesting and old-fashioned pueblo, built on the east bank of the Rio Grande, in New Mexico. In the four broad and dirty streets may be seen the huge outdoor ovens shown in the picture, often with heaps of firewood piled near t...

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Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

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Results Found: 5